EDCC Logo
 
Biology

Course Descriptions

BIOL 050: Issues in Human Biology

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

A study of current issues in human biology, focusing on several human life processes, such as mobility, digestion, respiration, circulation, nervous system integration, and reproduction. Dysfunction and disease are explored. Counts as High School Lab Science or Health credit.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Organize homework and lab information and effectively describe the lab work in writing. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Apply new science terminology in both discussion and writing. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Compare and contrast the specialized structural and functional systems that regulate human growth and development and that maintain health. [REASON]
  4. Recognize and describe essential components and processes involved in human structure, mobility, digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, and nervous system integration. [REASON]
  5. Propose ideas, solutions and analyze information while working in a small group setting. [ACT]
  6. Discuss readings, lab work and outside research within the classroom environment. [ACT]

BIOL& 100: Survey of Biology

Credits: 5.0

An introductory class for non-science majors, which includes an introduction to major biological principles and scientific processes. Emphasis will be on the application of modern biological knowledge in society in a way that is informative and exciting (was BIOL 100). Prerequisite(s): Placement in both MATH 090 and ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science. These include the principles underlying the theories and processes underlying scientific discovery and the nature of scientific evidence upon which such contemporary scientific theories are based. [REASON]
  2. Describe, identify, and explain, with examples, important concepts of biology, such as evolution, the biological transformation of matter and energy, the mechanisms of the replication and utilization of inherited information, the interaction of life with its environment, the relationship between biological structure and function, etc. [REASON]
  3. Articulate the importance of biology to their lives by applying the concepts and information of biology to problems that affect their lives, in particular, and our society, in general. [ACT]
  4. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data. [REASON]
  5. Correctly and safely use and care for appropriate tools and equipment. [ACT]
  6. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Effectively communicate biological knowledge and understanding using a variety of methods. [COMMUNICATE]

BIOL 105: Western Washington Ecology

Credits: 5.0

Explore the ecology of our terrestrial ecosystems and our impacts on them, while learning to recognize common land animals and plants and how they live. For non-science majors. Focus on field trips to local ecosystems. Up to three Saturday field trips, typically to NW Trek and Mt. Rainier. Prerequisite(s): Placement into both ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and MATH 090.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the biological principles that apply to Pacific Northwest terrestrial ecosystems. These principles include, among others, ecosystem structure and function, succession, the roles climate and topography play in the distribution of organisms and of ecosystems, adaptation, and evolution. [REASON]
  2. Identify the major plants, animals, and other organisms that live in western Washington, and describe their basic natural history. [REASON]
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the impacts that humans have on Western Washington ecosystems through their personal and political choices. [ACT]
  4. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of terrestrial ecosystems in the field. These include the principles underlying the theories and processes underlying scientific discovery and the nature of scientific evidence upon which such contemporary scientific theories are based. [REASON]
  5. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including sketching observations and using graphs. [REASON]
  6. Correctly and safely use and care for tools and equipment appropriate for the study of terrestrial systems. [ACT]
  7. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Effectively communicate biological knowledge and understanding using a variety of methods. [COMMUNICATE]

BIOL 106: Marine Biology

Credits: 5.0

Explore marine biology, learn to recognize common Northwest beach life, how they live, the ecology of different marine ecosystems, and our impact on these systems. Field trips to local beaches and a marine lab and research boat. Up to two Saturday field trips. Prerequisite(s): Placement into both ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and MATH 090. Additional field trip fees required.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the biological principles that apply to Pacific Northwest marine ecosystems. These principles include, among others, biological classification, ecosystem structure and function, adaptation, and evolution. [REASON]
  2. Identify the major organisms that live in our state's marine waters and describe their basic natural history. [REASON]
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the impacts that humans have on Western Washington marine ecosystems through their personal and political choices. [REASON]
  4. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of marine systems in the field and the lab. These include the principles underlying the theories and processes underlying scientific discovery and the nature of scientific evidence upon which such contemporary scientific theories are based. [REASON]
  5. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including sketching observations and using graphs. [REASON]
  6. Correctly and safely use and care for tools and equipment appropriate for the study of marine systems. [ACT]
  7. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Effectively communicate biological knowledge and understanding using a variety of methods. [COMMUNICATE]

BIOL 155: Special Topics

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

Topics and seminars of current interest in Biology.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Communicate and explain, using appropriate language of Biology, about topics of current interest in Biology. [REASON]

BIOL& 175: Human Biology

Credits: 5.0

Introductory course for the non-science major. Topics emphasize how the human body normally functions, ways infectious disease and genetic disorders interfere with human health, and how the human population can live more in balance with global environmental system (was BIOL 101). Prerequisite(s): Placement into both ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and MATH 090.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of human biology and use the scientific method as a means of problem solving. [REASON]
  2. Describe, identify, and explain, with examples, important biological concepts, such as homeostasis, the relationship between biological structure and function, cell theory, the biological transformation of matter and energy, the mechanisms of the replication and utilization of inherited information and evolution. [REASON]
  3. Explain how homeostatic systems work to maintain human health and fail to work in specific diseases and disorders. [REASON]
  4. Understand the basic structure of the human body and explain how several organ systems function. [REASON]
  5. Apply the concepts and information of human biology to problems that affect their lives, in particular, and our society, in general. Assess, for example, risk behaviors that may reduce either the quality or length of life. [ACT]
  6. Explain how human existence is dependent upon natural processes occurring in the biosphere and to identify human activities that adversely impact these life support systems. [REASON]
  7. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data. [REASON]
  8. Properly & safely use a variety of laboratory techniques & instruments. [ACT]
  9. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of human biology. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Demonstrate information literacy: understand and critically evaluate material (journal articles, websites, news articles, and other media sources of information) related to human biology. [REASON]

BIOL 210: Problem Solving for Majors Cellular Biology

Credits: 1.0

Designed specifically to improve student success in BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201). Provides practice for solving quantitative problems with improved overall understanding of principles. MANDATORY participation S/U grading (was BIOL 211). Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100, MATH 090 and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with a grade of 2.0 or higher. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201) is also required.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Appropriately use a vocabulary of biological terms, which will enable communication about biology, and analysis and explanation of biological phenomena. [REASON]
  2. Interpret, analyze and graph data, use equations and perform calculations in practice problem sets, and Biology&211-related laboratory examples. [REASON]
  3. Work in small groups to develop the skills necessary to solve complicated biological problems such as working in a stepwise manner through various types of genetics problems or problems related to pH. [REASON]
  4. Assess which levels of analysis are most appropriate for approaching a particular biological problem. [REASON]
  5. Discuss and describe principles of biology taught in Biology&211 in a small group environment. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Communicate (both in writing and orally) their understanding of the various biological concepts taught in Biology& 211. [COMMUNICATE]

BIOL& 211: Majors Cellular

Credits: 5.5

Introduction to molecular and cellular biology with emphasis on cellular structure and function, energetics, genetics, and evolution. Four hours lecture, and one 3-hour lab weekly. A course for life science majors, nursing and pre-professional students (was BIOL 201). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100, MATH 090 and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with a grade of 2.0 or higher. Enrollment in BIOL 210 (was BIOL 211) is highly recommended.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the nature of science and be able to use the scientific method when performing laboratory experiments. [REASON]
  2. Describe, identify, and explain, with examples, the important concepts of molecular and cellular biology, and integrate them across levels of biological organization. [REASON]
  3. Collect valid data, report data (using equations, graphs, charts and tables), critically analyze data and make conclusions based upon the experimental results. [REASON]
  4. Explain the mechanisms of evolution, critically evaluate evidence for evolution and describe the importance of evolution in biology. [REASON]
  5. Apply their understanding of chemistry to biology in explaining cellular structure, enzyme function, metabolic pathways, genetics, protein synthesis, cell signaling and other concepts in molecular and cellular biology. [REASON]
  6. Describe cell theory and use their knowledge of cell parts to explain the complex functions of cells. [REASON]
  7. Describe, compare and contrast the two mechanisms of nuclear division (mitosis and meiosis) and explain the biological importance of both and their relationship to DNA synthesis. [REASON]
  8. Explain the basics and basis of genetics and solve and explain typical introductory genetics problems (both Mendelian and non-Mendelian). [REASON]
  9. Explain how genes, proteins, and phenotypes (traits) are related and describe the processes of protein synthesis and gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. [REASON]
  10. Apply the concept of structure and function across levels of biological organization. [REASON]
  11. Describe and apply biotechnology tools and techniques including PCR, gel electrophoresis, restriction enzymes, bacterial transformation and others. [REASON]
  12. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of molecular and cellular biology. [COMMUNICATE]
  13. Appropriately select and properly and safely use a variety of laboratory techniques and instruments. [ACT]
  14. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  15. Apply biological knowledge to important personal, social and political issues. [ACT]
  16. Demonstrate information literacy: determine the extent of information needed and incorporate the information effectively and ethically into scientific writing. [REASON]

BIOL& 212: Majors Animal

Credits: 6.0

Second in three-quarter series (211, 212, 213). An introduction to the patterns and mechanisms of evolution, and animal (invertebrate and vertebrate) diversity, development, anatomy, and physiology. A course for life-science majors and pre-professionals (was BIOL 202). Prerequisite(s): BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201), ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with a grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of evolution, population genetics, animal phylogeny, physiology and development. [REASON]
  2. Describe, identify, and explain, with examples, the important concepts of biology that apply to evolutionary biology, population genetics, animal phylogeny, physiology and development. [REASON]
  3. Describe, compare and contrast major animal phyla with respect to structure and function of the major organ systems (using anatomical, physiological and evolutionary perspectives). [REASON]
  4. Integrate across levels of biological organization to explain particular evolutionary processes, animal morphology and animal physiology. [REASON]
  5. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of evolutionary biology, developmental biology, zoology and animal physiology. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including basic statistical testing. [REASON]
  7. Appropriately select and properly and safely use a variety of laboratory techniques and instruments, including observation & critical examination of microscopic of animal cells, tissues and organs and the basic principles of dissection of animal tissues and organs. [ACT]
  8. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Demonstrate information literacy: determine the extent of information needed, access information legally and efficiently, evaluate sources critically and incorporate the information effectively and ethically into scientific writing. [REASON]

BIOL& 213: Majors Plant

Credits: 6.0

Final quarter in college biology series (201, 202, 203). An introduction to ecology and the biology of plants, algae, prokaryotes, protists, and fungi with emphasis on structure, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, development and evolutionary trends of land plants (was BIOL 203). Prerequisite(s): BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201), ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) with a grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of prokaryote, fungal, and plant evolution, diversity and biology, and to ecology. These include the principles underlying the theories and processes underlying scientific discovery and the nature of scientific evidence upon which such contemporary scientific theories are based. [REASON]
  2. Describe, identify, and explain, with examples, important concepts of biology that apply to ecology and the evolution, structure and physiology of prokaryotes, fungi, and plants. [REASON]
  3. Integrate across levels of biological organization to explain ecological structure and the structure and function of prokaryotes, fungi, and plants. [REASON]
  4. Apply ecological and biological concepts in this course to regional, national and or global issues that may affect their lives in particular, and society in general. [ACT]
  5. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of biology. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including basic statistical testing. [REASON]
  7. Appropriately select and properly and safely use a variety of field and laboratory techniques and instruments. [ACT]
  8. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Demonstrate information literacy: determine the extent of information needed, access information legally and efficiently, evaluate sources critically and incorporate the information effectively and ethically into scientific writing. [REASON]

BIOL& 241: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Credits: 6.0

First in a two-quarter sequence (241, 242). The structure and function of cells and tissues of the human body and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, sensory, and nervous systems. A course for science, nursing, and pre-professional students (was BIOL 230). Four hours lecture and four hours lab, weekly. Prerequisite(s): BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201), ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105), MATH 090 and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of histology and human anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. [REASON]
  2. Apply important concepts of physiology to the integumentary, muscular, nervous and sensory systems, including homeostasis (and negative feedback), cell theory, cell-cell communications, flow down gradients, structure-function relationships and interdependence, to explain specific physiological processes. [REASON]
  3. Apply conceptual understanding of human anatomy and physiology to explain the mechanisms of specific skin, muscular, neural and sensory diseases and disorders and repair processes. [REASON]
  4. Integrate across levels of biological organization to explain particular human anatomy and physiology. [REASON]
  5. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of human anatomy and physiology, including correctly spelling and using anatomical, chemical and physiological terms. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including basic statistical testing. [REASON]
  7. Appropriately select and properly and safely use a variety of laboratory techniques and instruments, including observation and critical examination of microscopic of mammalian cells, fibers, and tissues the basic principles of dissection of mammalian tissues and organs. [ACT]
  8. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Demonstrate information literacy: determine the extent of information needed, access information legally and efficiently, evaluate sources critically and incorporate the information effectively and ethically into scientific writing. [REASON]
  10. Apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to important personal, public and global health issues. [ACT]

BIOL& 242: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Credits: 6.0

Second in a two-quarter sequence (241, 242). The structure and function of the endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, blood, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. A course for science, nursing, and pre-professional students (was BIOL 230). Four hours lecture and four hours lab, weekly. Prerequisite(s): BIOL& 241 (was BIOL 230), ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105), MATH 090 and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and basic understanding of the nature, process and methodology of science, especially as it relates to the study of histology and human anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. [REASON]
  2. Apply important concepts of physiology to the endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems, including homeostasis (and negative feedback), cell theory, cell-cell communications, flow down gradients, structure-function relationships and interdependence, to explain specific physiological processes. [REASON]
  3. Apply conceptual understanding of human anatomy and physiology to explain the mechanisms of specific endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive diseases and disorders and repair processes. [REASON]
  4. Integrate across levels of biological organization to explain particular human anatomy and physiology. [REASON]
  5. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of human anatomy and physiology, including correctly spelling and using anatomical, chemical and physiological terms. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Correctly and appropriately collect and analyze data, including basic statistical testing. [REASON]
  7. Appropriately select and properly and safely use a variety of laboratory techniques and instruments, including observation and critical examination of microscopic of mammalian cells, fibers, and tissues the basic principles of dissection of mammalian tissues and organs. [ACT]
  8. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Demonstrate information literacy: determine the extent of information needed, access information legally and efficiently, evaluate sources critically and incorporate the information effectively and ethically into scientific writing. [REASON]
  10. Apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to important personal, public and global health issues. [ACT]

BIOL 255: Special Topics

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

Topics and seminars of current interest in Biology.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Communicate and explain, using appropriate language of Biology, about topics of current interest in Biology. [REASON]

BIOL& 260: Microbiology

Credits: 6.0

An introduction to microorganisms for science, nursing, and pre-professional students. Topics include microscopy, microbial cell structure, function, growth, metabolism and genetics, biotechnology, virology, epidemiology, antimicrobials, host-microbe interactions, and immunology. Four hours lecture and four hours lab, weekly (was BIOL 250). Prerequisite(s): BIOL& 211 (was BIOL 201), ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105), MATH 090 and CHEM& 121 (was CHEM 101) or CHEM& 143 (was CHEM 133) or equivalent each with a grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply understanding of cellular and molecular biology, genetics, metabolism, and evolution from previous course(s) (e.g., BIOL& 211) to the microbial world. This includes comparing and contrasting prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structures, metabolism, genetics, and reproduction, and describing the importance of microbial evolution. [REASON]
  2. Describe the ubiquity and diversity of microorganisms and relate both to the critical roles they play in global processes and to all life. [REASON]
  3. Explain the impact, both positive and negative, of microorganisms on human health. [REASON]
  4. Discuss the interplay of microbial mechanisms of pathogenesis and the human immune system in an evolutionary context. [REASON]
  5. Articulate processes of microbial growth, and relate these to human methods of control. [REASON]
  6. Demonstrate proficiency in techniques important to the study, cultivation, and classification of microorganisms, including aseptic technique, biochemical tests, and growth assays. [ACT]
  7. Compare and contrast current and historical understanding of microorganisms. [REASON]
  8. Articulate the importance of microorganisms to the individual, to human beings, to all life, and to global processes. [REASON]
  9. Apply knowledge of microbiology to important personal, health, social and political issues. [ACT]
  10. Communicate effectively using language and understanding of biology. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Productively work in groups to successfully complete group activities and assignments. [COMMUNICATE]