EDCC Logo
 
Computer Information Systems

Course Descriptions

CIS 100: Introduction to Business Computing

Credits: 5.0

An introduction to business computing concepts and applications using Windows and MS Office. Includes introduction to HTML, hardware components, info processing cycle in business, how networks work, etc. Students may receive credit for either CIS 100 or BSTEC 130, but not both. Prerequisite(s): Placement into EAP 121 or BRDGE 093 or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and identify basic concepts and terminology of introductory-level business computing technology. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Describe the various components within information systems' and identify their functions. [REASON]
  3. Demonstrate entry-level proficiency in using microcomputer applications including spreadsheets, database, word processing, HTML, and presentation. [REASON]
  4. Observe, analyze, synthesize, apply, and evaluate information related to computer technology. [REASON]

CIS 102: Intermediate Business Computing

Credits: 5.0

Extends the concepts and software learned in CIS 100. Intermediate expertise of word-processing, spreadsheets, and database software is attained. Concepts include trends/careers in Information Systems, database/IS management, IS development, security, privacy and ethics. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 or BSTEC 130 with a GPA of at least 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate intermediate level proficiency in microcomputer applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate quantitative skills and critical thinking through the analysis of data and information. [REASON]
  3. Describe the issues of computer ethics, security risks, information privacy, disaster recovery planning, and backup strategies. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Identify techniques used to stay current with IT applications and career choices. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 114: Math and Problem Solving

Credits: 5.0

Builds problem solving skills needed by computer students. Skills covered: logical reasoning, problem analysis and computation. This course prepares students for the first course in programming. Prerequisite(s): Placement into MATH 080.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply different strategies to solve problems, including brainstorming, flowcharting, estimating, inductive and deductive reasoning, and instant insight. [REASON]
  2. Apply computational methods to solve problems using basic arithmetic, signed numbers, scientific notation, order of operation, fractions, and percentages. [REASON]
  3. Apply elementary algebra to problem solving, using variables, algebraic notation, basic algebraic operations, and linear equations. [REASON]
  4. Solve computer programming problems using Boolean Algebra. [REASON]
  5. Convert between various number systems, including decimal, binary, and hexadecimal. [REASON]
  6. Describe structured programming constructs and develop algorithms for Top Down techniques and Bottom Up techniques. [REASON]

CIS 116: IT Prior Learning Assessment

Credits: 1.0 to 5.0

Students will either create an "exit portfolio" for their ATA requirement or an "entrance portfolio" for placement into upper level CIS programs. Class can also be used to challenge or waive program requirements. Registration by entry code only; obtain code from instructor. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

For Entrance into CIS programs:

  1. Explain the role of skill standards within the IT industry. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Demonstrate achieved skills standards as learned in industry. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Create an Entrance portfolio which demonstrates their degree of mastery of skills for proper placement into upper-level CIS programs. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. For course challenges: Demonstrate achieved skill sets in CIS objectives for a given course (at 75% or better). [COMMUNICATE]
  5. For exit from CIS ATA degrees: create an Exit Portfolio, which features a resume and examples of work from previous courses. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 125: Network Workstation

Credits: 5.0

Windows DOS with emphasis on command line functions. Topics include: Installation and Windows XP features, OS navigation, and administrative tools. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 or BSTEC 130 and concurrent enrollment or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Determine and execute appropriate beginning and intermediate Windows command line commands, including their proper usage and syntax. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate basic Operating System and command line concepts. [REASON]
  3. Use and configure the Windows graphical user interface (GUI). [REASON]
  4. Perform basic and intermediate Windows OS configurations. [REASON]
  5. Create and manage basic batch files using basic batch file commands. [REASON]

CIS 155: Special Topics

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

New topics and technologies in computer information systems are presented. Topics will change from quarter to quarter, but sample topics might include: Operating systems, Networks, Application Development, and Web Development.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explore current topics of interest in Information Technology. [REASON]

CIS 161: A+ Hardware Support I

Credits: 5.0

An introductory course in computer hardware. Students will install, upgrade, maintain and troubleshoot hardware components. Students learn to identify error messages and symptoms of hardware failures and take the appropriate action. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 with a minimum grade of 2.5, or concurrent enrollment or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe how hardware components function together to make a computer work. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Describe how software interacts with hardware. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. List several ways to protect hardware and software. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Advise a user on upgrading their PC. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Describe the boot process. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Isolate computer problems using varied analytic and creative approaches. [REASON]
  7. Identify PC hardware components and assemble and disassemble PCs. [REASON]
  8. Install hardware components, upgrades and peripheral devices. [REASON]
  9. Work successfully in a group environment. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 162: PC Desktop Support

Credits: 5.0

Advanced topics in desktop support. Development of problem-solving skills used in supporting the desktop user. Students work in teams to create and manage their own helpdesk. Emphasis on trouble- shooting, problem-solving, and customer support. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 with a minimum grade of 2.5, or concurrent enrollment or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Setup defaults for and troubleshoot the installation of several Microsoft Operating Systems and MS Office. [REASON]
  2. Effectively utilize a knowledge base to solve a computer problem. [REASON]
  3. Create and implement maintenance and backup plans. [REASON]
  4. Install and configure hardware and amp; software for devices such as a hard disk, CD-ROM, scanner, printer, sound card, digital camera, etc. [REASON]
  5. Set up and run a mock help desk, working in a team environment. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Educate and train others on various operating systems and applications. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Facilitate customer service and support. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Effectively communicate with customers and fellow team members. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Research, create and give an oral presentation. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 163: A+ Hardware Support II

Credits: 5.0

Students will repair/build computer systems and peripherals in a simulated shop environment. Topics include: system evaluation, classification, software installation, configuration and peer-to-peer networking. Preparation in A+ certification is included. Prerequisite(s): CIS 161 with a grade of 2.5 or higher or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate and classify systems and determine appropriate configuration and repair actions. [REASON]
  2. Create and follow work orders and tracking documentation. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Assist customers in making decisions regarding their computer needs and equipment. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Assist a small business customer to evaluate, design and implement a small business/home office to meet their computing needs. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Test various PC components and sub-systems. [REASON]
  6. Describe typical shop virus control and licensing policies. [REASON]
  7. Repair and upgrade computer equipment in a simulated commercial environment. [REASON]
  8. Load and configure a typical installation of various operating systems. [REASON]
  9. Develop and analyze a site survey. [REASON]
  10. Act responsibly, both individually and collaboratively, within changing environments. [ACT]
  11. Explain the ethics involved handling customer's computer equipment. [REASON]
  12. Work in a team environment to achieve a successful outcome. [ACT]

CIS 171: Cisco Networking I

Credits: 5.0

First in a series of four courses preparing students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam. Topics include protocols and services of the OSI and TCP layered models, principles and structure of IP addressing and subnetting, fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations, and configuration of network devices. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125 with a minimum GPA of at least 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the fundamental concepts of routing and switching using the OSI layers and the Protocol Data Units (PDU) to explain each step of the process. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Explain fundamental Ethernet concepts such as media, services, and operation. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Identify and describe the protocols and services presented in the OSI learning model, as well as the industry-standard TCP/IP networking model. [REASON]
  4. Demonstrate the troubleshooting techniques necessary to verify small network operations and analyze data traffic utilizing common network utilities. [REASON]
  5. Design and implement a hierarchical IP Addressing scheme using subnetting in order to meet the needs of a medium size business. [REASON]

CIS 172: Cisco Networking II

Credits: 5.0

Second in a series of four courses preparing students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam. Topics include Static and Dynamic routing, the RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF routing protocols, Variable Length Subnet Masking (VLSM) and Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR), and routing table structure and behavior. Prerequisite(s): CIS 171 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the purpose and nature of routing tables and the route lookup process to determine the path packets will take in a network. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Describe the purpose of static routes and configure and verify static and default routing. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Describe the functions, characteristics, main features, and operations of the following distance vector routing protocols: Routing Information Protocol (RIPv1 and RIPv2), and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP). [REASON]
  4. Describe the functions, characteristics, main features, and operations of the following of link-state routing protocols: Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). [REASON]
  5. Describe the role of dynamic routing protocols and place these protocols in the context of modern network design. [REASON]
  6. Configure and verify basic and intermediate operations of a router. [REASON]
  7. Use router show and debug commands to troubleshoot common errors that occur in small routed networks. [REASON]

CIS 173: Cisco Networking III

Credits: 5.0

Third in a series of four courses preparing students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam. Topics include the design and implementation of a converged (VoIP, Video, Data) switched network using Virtual LANs (VLANs), Wireless LANs (WLANs), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), Spanning Tree Protocol, and Inter-VLAN routing. Prerequisite(s): CIS 171 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe enhanced switching technologies and explain how VLANs create logically separate networks, and how routing occurs between them. [REASON]
  2. Describe standards associated with wireless media. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Identify and describe the purpose of the components in a small wireless network, and identify basic configuration parameters on a wireless network to ensure that devices are secure and connect to the correct access points. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Identify and resolve common switched network media issues, configuration issues, auto-negotiation, and switch hardware failures. [REASON]
  5. Manage Cisco IOS configuration files including save, edit, upgrade, and restore. [REASON]
  6. Configure, verify, and troubleshoot VLANs, trunking on Cisco switches, interVLAN routing, VTP, and RSTP using basic utilities, the show and debug commands. [REASON]

CIS 174: Cisco Networking IV

Credits: 5.0

Fourth in a series of four courses preparing students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam. Topics include PPP and Frame-Relay WAN technologies, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), Access Control Lists (ACLs), Network Address Translation (NAT), IPv6, application of WAN security concepts, principles of traffic manipulation, and enterprise network troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): CIS 172 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe current network security threats and explain how to implement a comprehensive security policy to mitigate common threats to network devices, hosts, and applications. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Describe the importance, benefits, role, impact, and components of VPN technology. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Describe ACLs, and verify, monitor and troubleshoot ACLs in a network environment. [REASON]
  4. Explain the basic operation of Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT), and identify, and resolve common NAT and PAT issues. [REASON]
  5. Configure and verify a basic WAN serial connection, a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) connection between Cisco routers, and Frame Relay on Cisco routers. [REASON]
  6. Explain the operation and benefits of the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and the Domain Name System (DNS), and configure, verify, and troubleshoot DHCP and DNS operations on a router. [REASON]

CIS 180: Wireless Networking

Credits: 5.0

Provides the material and the experience needed for the Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) exam. Topics include RF Technologies, Wireless LAN Implementation and Management, Wireless LAN Security, and Wireless LAN Standards. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install and configure common Wireless Access Points. [REASON]
  2. Use a WiFi scanner to observe the Radio Frequency Environment. [REASON]
  3. Identify the data rates and spread spectrum technologies for the various 802.11 standards. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Calculate basic Radio Frequency math. [REASON]
  5. Identify the purpose and function of RF antennas and wireless accessories. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Identify the numerous security threats and provide the appropriate solutions. [REASON]
  7. Perform a simple RF site survey with documentation. [REASON]

CIS 185: Introduction to Windows Servers

Credits: 2.0

Introduction to networking and network virtualization. Students configure virtual machine settings, hardware and software, install network operating systems and manage network system settings within a virtual environment. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install and configure virtualization software and hardware settings on a host system. [REASON]
  2. Configure network settings on host systems running in a virtual state. [REASON]
  3. Describe basic networking concepts. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Install and configure Windows Server in a virtual environment. [REASON]
  5. Configure basic shares and NTFS security settings. [REASON]
  6. Demonstrate the application of Windows server roles, active directory, domains, and user accounts. [REASON]

CIS 198: Individual Project

Credits: 1.0 to 5.0

Independent projects under the direction and supervision of a CIS instructor. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available. Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Present evidence of completion of all aspects of a project as specified in a contract created and agreed upon by the student and instructor. [COMMUNICATE]


CIS 199: Special Projects

Credits: 5.0

Note: Credit for a design project is available with approval. For more information, please contact the CIS department at (425)640-1902. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explore current topics of interest in Information Technology. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 201: Digital Forensics and the Law

Credits: 5.0

Covers legal issues relevant to information security and digital forensics professionals. Topics: Electronic discovery, expert testimony, electronic surveillance, evidence retention, preservation and spoliation, privacy issues, Sarbanes Oxley and other legislation.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe how electronic discovery differs from digital forensics. [REASON]
  2. List and describe the common legal issues related to electronic evidence. [REASON]
  3. Explain and list the various legislation and regulations that impact technology. [REASON]
  4. Explain how the Fourth Amendment pertains to computer privacy. [REASON]
  5. Summarize in writing the Washington State Laws that pertain to Cyber Crime. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Critique an acceptable use policy. [REASON]
  7. List and describe the generally accepted computer forensic procedures and the importance/impact of each. [REASON]
  8. Analyze and critique forensic analysis reports. [REASON]
  9. Analyze and critique search warrants, affidavits, and subpoenas. [REASON]

CIS 220: Enterprise Architecture

Credits: 5.0

Introduction to enterprise systems architectures from various perspectives; covers conceptual frameworks and considerations for managing enterprise application integration projects, relationships between components of systems, and research of emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): Completion of one of the following courses with a grade of 2.5: CIS 116 or CIS 125.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and describe a variety of common industry frameworks and models for enterprise architecture analysis and decision-making. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Understand and describe the role of business architectures, motivations and goals in determining appropriate information systems architectures and solutions. [REASON]
  3. Research and describe the core concepts, benefits and risks of data/information architectures and evaluate existing data/information architecture designs. [REASON]
  4. Research and describe the core components, benefits and risks of various application architectures and evaluate existing application architecture designs. [REASON]
  5. Research and describe the core concepts, benefits and risks of various technology solution architectures and evaluate existing architecture designs. [REASON]
  6. Research and describe the core concepts, benefits and risks of various network architectures and evaluate existing architecture designs. [REASON]
  7. Understand and describe the concepts, benefits and risks of various architectural approaches such as multi-tier and service-oriented architectures. [REASON]
  8. Evaluate and plan for the integration of emerging technologies. [REASON]
  9. Evaluate the total cost of ownership and return on investment for architecture alternatives. [REASON]

CIS 233: Systems Analysis

Credits: 5.0

A practical approach to real world systems analysis and design. Includes the systems development life cycle, structured methodologies and project planning. A case study project is analyzed, requirements are written and a systems design specification document is prepared. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least 45 credits toward an ATA degree or CIS 116 and completion of at least one writing requirement or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the phases of a systems development lifecycle. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Use root-cause analysis techniques to define the scope of a system problem. [REASON]
  3. Use industry-standard modeling methods to examine and diagram the components of a system. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Identify and write functional requirements for a system. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Research and compare possible solution options to meet system requirements. [REASON]
  6. Evaluate and rate feasibility of potential options. [REASON]
  7. Propose a solution that would meet defined requirements. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 234: Systems Design and Development

Credits: 5.0

Provides hands-on experience in systems design and implementation using a prototype approach. The case study is designed and tested using application development software. User manuals are written. Prerequisite(s): CIS 233 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Work in teams to define a project plan and perform systems lifecycle (SDLC) activities. [EXPLORE]
  2. Prepare and deliver formal written and oral status reports. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Create a system design document, including database design, input and output design, process specifications, and user interface design standards. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Apply user-centered design principles to create a prototype of the user interface design that meets documented requirements; prepare a formal demonstrate of this prototype. [REASON]
  5. Develop a database application (prototype) that meets documented data and process specifications. [REASON]
  6. Write and implement a test plan for validating system functionality against requirements. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Write a user manual and training plan. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Prepare a roll-out and maintenance plan for project implementation. [REASON]
  9. Perform a structured walk-through and demonstration of a complete working system. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Perform final project wrap-up activities and compile documentation for all aspects of the systems design, development, and implementation phases of the SDLC. [EXPLORE]

CIS 235: Requirements Modeling

Credits: 5.0

Advanced course in business modeling methods which will provide students an understanding of various tools and techniques used by analysts. Topics include UML, CASE tools, conceptual design, and physical implementation. Enterprise Systems Analysis will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): CIS 250 and 233 with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the roles of formal data and process modeling approaches for discovering and validating business information systems requirements. [REASON]
  2. Discuss the various perspectives and aspects of an enterprise's information systems architecture that need to be considered when analyzing business requirements. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Recognize and describe the components of various types of models used by systems analysts. [REASON]
  4. Choose appropriate modeling methods and tools for specific analysis situations. [REASON]
  5. Use models to recognize common data design patterns and process archetypes. [REASON]
  6. Use computer assisted systems engineering (CASE) and/or other diagramming tools to create models. [REASON]
  7. Recognize and employ industry-standard diagramming notations when creating models. [REASON]
  8. Plan and lead a facilitated joint application design (JAD) session, demonstrating the use of a modeling method. [REASON]

CIS 241: Web Development I

Credits: 5.0

Internet and intranet Web site development using XHTML approached from a source code perspective. Covers tags, forms, linked objects, CSS, frames, tables, and introduction to the use of scripting. Students build multi-page Web sites. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 and CS 115 (was CMPSC 115) or concurrent enrollment with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform content and technical analysis on web applications and websites. [REASON]
  2. Use XHTML to develop, debug, maintain and document web applications and websites. [REASON]
  3. Implement standardized application / site design. [REASON]
  4. Compare and contrast different browser's effects on XHTML documents. [REASON]
  5. Use the basic principles of Web documents. [REASON]
  6. Control the appearance of a Web Page through the use of XHTML tables. [REASON]
  7. Create a website with frames. [REASON]
  8. Use XHTML forms. [REASON]
  9. Create XHTML style through inline, embedded and Cascading Style Sheets. [REASON]

CIS 242: Web Development II: JavaScript

Credits: 5.0

Continuation of concepts and practice introduced in CIS 241. Topics include: embedding, inline and external scripts, functions, form validation, loops, conditional statements, strings, numbers, and DHTML. Prerequisite(s): CIS 241 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use client-side scripting with well-formed Web pages. [REASON]
  2. Recognize client-side variables and data types and the operations that can be performed on them. [REASON]
  3. Write client-side functions, event handlers and control structures. [REASON]
  4. Use the browser object-model to create scripts that control browser functionality. [REASON]
  5. Verify form data through scripting validation. [REASON]
  6. Create and implement client-side web applications. [REASON]
  7. Use object-oriented programming within client-side scripting. [REASON]
  8. Save state information through the use of hidden form fields, query-strings and cookies. [REASON]
  9. Add interactivity to Web pages through the Document Object Model and Dynamic HTML. [REASON]
  10. List the concepts of server-side programming. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Introduce database connectivity (time allowed). [REASON]

CIS 243: Web Development III: Introduction to PHP

Credits: 5.0

Topics include: Server-side scripting for web pages using PHP. Students will learn fundamentals of PHP scripting including functions, logical structure, and database connectivity used in creating web sites. Prerequisite(s): CIS 242 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Review Internet protocols and the use of Internet protocols on the World Wide Web. [REASON]
  2. Identify and understand the differences between client-side and server-side scripting. [REASON]
  3. Use the appropriate script, client-side or server-side, to complete an interactive website. [REASON]
  4. Use the Document Object Model to interact with a Web page. [REASON]
  5. Use properties, methods and event handlers associated with the Document Object. [REASON]
  6. Create and use scripting variables and data types using appropriate naming conventions. [REASON]
  7. Use arithmetic, comparison and logical operators in a scripting language. [REASON]
  8. Create procedures and re-usable functions in a scripting language. [REASON]
  9. Describe how server-side scripting is processed by a Web server and create pages which include server-side scripting. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Use the request object to retrieve information supplied by a Web user to a form. [REASON]
  11. Create an interactive website using a database. [REASON]

CIS 244: Web Development IV: Introduction to Search Engine Optimization

Credits: 5.0

An introduction to Search Engine Optimization and content management for the web. A step-by-step approach to organic and paid search engine optimization. Learn about free statistic collectors and what makes a web site move up in placement. Prerequisite(s): CIS 241 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Determine the business model of a website such as: Business-to-business, Business-to-consumer, Large organization, Small Organization, Brick-and-Mortar vs E-Commerce, Social networking, Blog. [REASON]
  2. Compare and contrast how different search engines work. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Develop and implement an SEO plan. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Create a baseline and keyword strategy for a website. [REASON]
  5. Create an ongoing plan to establish good SEO practices. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 245: Web Development V Introduction to Cascading Style Sheets

Credits: 5.0

Students will learn the details required to combine CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) with HTML, XHTML, or XML to create rich, powerful web sites. Topics include: selectors, cascade and inheritance, text and font manipulation, layout, and positioning. Prerequisite(s): CIS 241 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Make clear decisions about the advantages-disadvantages of using CSS over other web technologies. [REASON]
  2. Create basic, intermediate web sites using CSS for page layout. [REASON]
  3. Use CSS incorporated within HTML/XHTML. [REASON]
  4. Create and use CSS selectors to affect the elements of a web page. [REASON]
  5. Apply advanced techniques of CSS within web pages and sites. [REASON]
  6. Communicate assumptions and choices made in the techniques used to create web sites. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Engage in conversations about the different development tools and technologies used to create web sites. [COMMUNICATE] Communicate the advantages and disadvantages of web page layout using CSS. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Demonstrate the ability to create web pages or sites, which acknowledges the differences in access capabilities across cultures. [EXPLORE]
  9. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively within groups. [ACT]
  10. Apply the appropriate tools and technology to facilitate sustainable web sites. [ACT]

 


CIS 246: Web Development VI JavaScript Frameworks

Credits: 5.0

Students will investigate and use the advanced techniques available in JavaScript Frameworks (libraries) such as JQuery, AJAX, MooTools and Prototype. Prerequisite(s): CIS 242 and 260 with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Make clear decisions about the advantages-disadvantages of using advanced scripting techniques over other web technologies. [REASON]
  2. Create intermediate web sites using JQuery, AJAX, MooTools and other JavaScript framework libraries. [REASON]
  3. Read, modify, and create XML documents through AJAX libraries. [REASON]
  4. Create advanced user interface using MooTools, JQuery, and Prototype. [REASON]
  5. Incorporate advanced scripting techniques into web pages and web sites. [REASON]
  6. Make clear decisions and use the appropriate JavaScript framework technology as needed within a web page or site. [REASON]
  7. Create clear and useful documentation of technologies to create a web page or site. [REASON]
  8. Communicate assumptions and choices made in the techniques used to create web sites. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Engage in conversations about the different development tools and technologies used to create web sites. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Communicate the advantages and disadvantages of each of the different JavaScript framework technologies. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively within groups. [EXPLORE]
  12. Apply the appropriate tools and technology to facilitate sustainable web sites. [EXPLORE]
     

CIS 250: Database Theory and Design

Credits: 5.0

Designed to recognize data as a business resource. Database models are discussed from both a programmer's and a user's viewpoint. Roles of database designer and administrator will be examined. Prerequisite(s): Twenty credits towards an ATA degree or certificate or CIS 116, or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe fundamental principals of database theory and design. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Research and analyze business data requirements. [REASON]
  3. Identify high-level business rules for data modeling. [REASON]
  4. Document high-level business rules for data modeling. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Create and refine conceptual and logical data models. [REASON]
  6. Validate conceptual and logical data models. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Select unique identifiers and normalize the data model. [REASON]
  8. Understand the role of SQL in the business and database contexts. [REASON]
  9. Recognize the basic components and issues of database application design. [REASON]

CIS 251: Structured Query Language (SQL)

Credits: 5.0

Covers topics in Structure Query Language (SQL) including statements such as select, update, insert, delete, create. Emphasis on the ability to extract, update and maintain databases using SQL. Prerequisite(s): CIS 250 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain what SQL is. [REASON]
  2. Identify the major data types. [REASON]
  3. Describe why SQL is such a powerful tool. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Create relational databases using SQL. [REASON]
  5. Perform basic database maintenance and administration such as: insert, update and delete data, create, drop and modify tables. [REASON]
  6. Create various types of select statements including: table, multi-table and joins, and be proficient with functions and expressions. [REASON]
  7. Explain the significance of and create indexes. [REASON]

CIS 253: Application Development Tools

Credits: 5.0

An introduction to application development using MS-Access. Includes development of tables, forms, queries, reports, macros, and menus needed to support the application. This course is a prerequisite for CIS 234. Prerequisite(s): CIS 250 and CS 115 or concurrent enrollment in both, with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the fundamental principles of application design [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Use MS Access to build a student designed application. [REASON]
  3. Describe how Access integrates with enterprise systems. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Given a database design and a few pre-built entities, build the following components of an Access application: Tables to store data; Forms and sub-forms for data entry into tables; Reports that display data in appropriate groups and formatting; Queries that assemble data from several tables for use with forms and reports; HTML Documents created from custom queries and exported to the Web; Modules and Event Procedures with VBA code to accomplish specific tasks; Menus for easy access to the various parts of the application. [REASON]

CIS 254: Database Procedures and Functions

Credits: 5.0

Students learn to create functions using procedural programming languages, store functions, and call functions. Includes creating, using, modifying stored procedures and functions within a RDBMS. Students learn control structures of a database programming language. Prerequisite(s): CIS 251 with minimum grade of 2.5.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the concept of a scalable relational database management system RDBMS. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Explain the difference between client/server RDBMS and client RDBMS. [REASON]
  3. Explain the uses of networked RDBMS. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Explain and use data manipulation language (DML) within procedures and functions. [REASON]
  5. Make use of save points and roll back within procedural programming. [REASON]
  6. Use of conditional control within procedures and functions (if statements). [REASON]
  7. Create exceptions and errors within DML and handle them within procedural programming. [REASON]
  8. Understand the use of and create iterative control structures within procedural programming (loops). [REASON]
  9. Create record sets through the use of SQL and procedural programming. [REASON]
  10. Develop and use stored procedures and functions. [REASON]
  11. Use the advanced features of stored procedural programming. [REASON]

CIS 255: Special Topics

Credits: 5.0

New topics and technologies in computer information systems are presented. Topics will change from quarter to quarter, but sample topics might include: Operating systems, Networks, Application Development, and Web Development.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explore current topics of interest in Information Technology. [REASON]

CIS 260: Introduction to XML

Credits: 5.0

Topics include how XML is used in Web sites and data storage applications, XSL, incorporating style with XSL and CSS, Namespaces, DTDs and Schemas. Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 and CIS 114 with minimum grades of 3.0 or equivalent.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create, structure, and script XML documents. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate proper XML syntax. [REASON]
  3. Explain element hierarchies in an XML document. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Write well-formed XML documents. [REASON]
  5. Use Namespaces in XML. [REASON]
  6. Add style to XML using CSS and XSL. [REASON]
  7. Transform XML into other formats using XSLT. [REASON]
  8. Use XPath and XPointer for locating specific XML data. [REASON]
  9. Use XLink for linking XML and non-XML resources. [REASON]
  10. Manipulate XML documents using DOM. [REASON]
  11. Validate XML using DTDs and Schemas. [REASON]
  12. Incorporate XML into traditional databases. [REASON]

CIS 264: Active Directory Administration

Credits: 5.0

Introduction to installing, managing and maintaining a network operating system. Topics include: Install Windows Server, overview of Active Directory, Active Directory sites, FSMO roles, Active Directory administration and group policies. Prerequisite(s): CIS 180 (was CEN 280), CIS 185 (was CEN 216), or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install, troubleshoot, and configure Windows Server Forests and Domains using Active Directory. [REASON]
  2. Configure and troubleshoot Windows server FSMO Roles and Global catalog. [REASON]
  3. Plan a Group Policy Management and Implementation Policy. [REASON]
  4. Use Group Policies to Configure and troubleshoot a user environment. [REASON]
  5. Configure Active Directory certificate services. [REASON]

CIS 265: Network Administration

Credits: 5.0

Focuses on implementation, management and maintenance of Windows Server. topics include: Managing and maintaining DNS and DHCP server roles, remote access services (RRAS) and wireless, File and Print services, updating Windows Server, securing Data Transmission and Authentication. Prerequisite(s): CIS 180 (was CEN 280), CIS 185 (was CEN 216), or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install, troubleshoot, and configure Windows Server software. [REASON]
  2. Configure basic network settings. [REASON]
  3. Identify and configure server roles. [REASON]
  4. Configure and Monitor Print Services. [REASON]
  5. Maintain and Update Windows Servers. [REASON]
  6. Maintain Network Health with Network Access Protection and IPSec. [REASON]
  7. Secure Data Transmission and Authentication. [REASON]

CIS 266: Server Administration

Credits: 5.0

Managing and maintaining Windows Server. Topics include: Deploy an Application and a File Server, and use the File Services Roles. Deploy Print and Fax services, Deploy IIS Services, Secure IIS Service, and configure Terminal Service clients. Prerequisite(s): CIS 180 (was CEN 280), CIS 185 (was CEN 216), or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Deploy a Windows Application Server. [REASON]
  2. Deploy File, Fax, and Print Servers. [REASON]
  3. Deploy Media, IIS Services, and Web Applications Servers. [REASON]
  4. Secure Web Services. [REASON]
  5. Configure and troubleshoot Terminal Services. [REASON]
  6. Configure Terminal Services Clients. [REASON]
  7. Configure a Terminal Services Gateway. [REASON]
  8. Manage and Monitor Application Servers. [REASON]

CIS 267: Exchange Server

Credits: 5.0

Configure and administer the current version of Exchange Server. Topics include: installing and configuring Exchange Server; creating address lists, public folders and virtual servers; implementing SMTP and security, including Exchange database backup and restore. Prerequisite(s): CIS 264 (was CEN 264) or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install Windows Exchange on a Windows Server. [REASON]
  2. Configure and test Email for recipients, and groups on Exchange Server. [REASON]
  3. Configure Email on client computers to receive and send Email to and from Exchange Server. [REASON]
  4. Configure security settings on an Exchange Server. [REASON]
  5. Configure backup and restore policies on an Exchange Server database. [REASON]

CIS 268: ISA Server

Credits: 5.0

Introduction to implementation and maintenance of an ISA server. Topics include: Firewall policies, Internet web caching, configuring systems in a complex router environment, setting up point to point VPNS and securing remote client connections. Prerequisite(s): CIS 267 (was CEN 267) or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install Internet Security Acceleration server in a windows server environment. [REASON]
  2. Configure Internet Security Acceleration server to cache web content and act as a proxy for workstations in a local area network. [REASON]
  3. Configure internet Security Acceleration server as a firewall allowing access from the LAN to the Internet. [REASON]
  4. Configure Internet Security Acceleration server publishing so that a client can access Email from the internet. [REASON]
  5. Configure client computers to use the Internet Security Acceleration server for caching and gateway services. [REASON]

CIS 272: Digital Forensics I

Credits: 5.0

Covers: Basic procedures and methodologies for digital forensics that must be mastered. Acquisition, identification and analysis of evidence, documentation strategies, manual and automated analysis tools, working as an expert witness. Maps to the ACE and CSFA certifications. Prerequisite(s): CIS 161 with a grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the origins of computer forensics. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Describe the relationship between law enforcement and industry. [REASON]
  3. Discuss ethics and its impact on computer forensics. [REASON]
  4. Describe the computing investigation process. [REASON]
  5. Describe disk structures. [REASON]
  6. Describe the Microsoft boot process. [REASON]
  7. Identify where data can be hidden on different platforms. [REASON]
  8. Build a forensic bootable CD/DVD. [REASON]
  9. Describe how to build a forensic workstation. [REASON]
  10. Describe the profession of computer forensics. [REASON]
  11. Use current forensics tools. [REASON]
  12. Perform graphic image recovery. [REASON]
  13. Perform email recovery and investigations. [REASON]
  14. Discuss a code of ethics and conduct related to the information security and digital forensics professions. [ REASON]
  15. Identify standards of professionalism and ethical behavior for information security and digital forensics professionals, and apply these standards successfully to ethical dilemmas. [ACT]
  16. Describe issues related to privacy and determine how to address them technically and ethically. [REASON]

CIS 273: Digital Forensics II

Credits: 5.0

Covers advanced topics. Registry, event logs, internet history, and creating analysis reports. Students will be introduced to processes for conducting testing and verification. Each student will process a forensic case. Maps to the ACE and CSFA certifications. Prerequisite(s): CIS 272 with a GPA of at least 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create forensically sound image files and working copies of drives from both live and at rest computer systems using a variety of commercial and open source tools. [REASON]
  2. Employ various techniques to overcome encryption and passwords using a variety of commercial and open source tools. [REASON]
  3. Describe the differences between the FAT16 and FAT32 file systems and boot records. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Describe the function and layout of: master boot records, partition tables and how they can be hidden and restored, and the NTFS Master File Table. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Identify and describe the Windows registry keys that would be examined relevant to a computer forensics investigation. [REASON]
  6. Forensically examine an image from a NTFS system. [REASON]
  7. Recover deleted files and file fragments using both manual and automated methods. [REASON]
  8. Conduct a forensic analysis involving email and other Internet activity. [REASON]
  9. Forensically process thumb drives and memory sticks. [REASON]
  10. Create a Curriculum Vita and properly document experience and education for work in the field of computer forensics. [REASON]
  11. Analyze a code of ethics and conduct related to the information security and digital forensics professions. [REASON]
  12. Identify standards of professionalism and ethical behavior for information security and digital forensics professionals, and apply these standards successfully to ethical dilemmas. [ACT]
  13. Describe issues related to privacy and determine how to address them technically and ethically. [REASON]

CIS 274: Introduction to Network Security

Credits: 5.0

Topics include: Communication, infrastructure, operational and organizational security, underlying principles used to secure networks, security technologies, intrusion detection, authentication, and cryptography basics. Maps to Security+ exam. Prerequisite(s): CIS 171 with a grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the three basic cryptographic functions. [REASON]
  2. Describe how cryptographic functions can be used to enable security services. [REASON]
  3. Describe authentication, integrity and confidentiality and how they relate to security systems. [REASON]
  4. Describe the use of public key technology in networks. [REASON]
  5. Compare and contrast the various mechanisms that provide authentication services. [REASON]
  6. Given a network security scenario, decide on the proper authentication technology. [REASON]
  7. Compare and contrast several security technologies that provide solutions for securing network access. [REASON]
  8. Compare and contrast authentication and authorization and access control. [REASON]
  9. Describe security technologies used for establishing identity. [REASON]
  10. Describe how security technologies are implemented in corporate networks. [REASON]
  11. Identify the strengths and weaknesses associated with protocols designed to authenticate users. [REASON]
  12. Describe the technologies that exist at the different TCP/IP layers. [REASON]
  13. Discuss how digital signatures are used for secure transactions. [REASON]
  14. Identify and describe the 3 categories of network security threats. [REASON]
  15. Describe infrastructure security concepts. [REASON]

CIS 275: Host System Security I

Credits: 5.0

Topics include: Operating system hardening, malware prevention and detection, IPSec and PKI. Students will learn how to plug security holes, authenticate users, defend against attacks and add security practices into administrative tasks. Prerequisite(s): CIS 264 and CIS 274 or concurrent enrollment, each with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. List and describe the elements of a computer deployment plan that covers security issues. [REASON]
  2. Summarize practices for configuring workstations, maintaining workstation integrity, and improving user awareness. [REASON]
  3. Describe and employ various tools to analyze and implement security measures on a Windows system. [REASON]
  4. Configure security policies for Windows systems. [REASON]
  5. Perform a security audit of a Windows system using industry standards and guidelines. [REASON]
  6. Configure Windows XP's TCP/IP settings that allow for enhanced security. [REASON]
  7. Compare and contrast types of malware and describe their respective preventative/reactive measures. [REASON]
  8. Describe the incident response process and how computer security incidents are managed. [REASON]

CIS 277: Security Implementation I

Credits: 5.0

Topics include: Analyzing network traffic and vulnerability of various protocols, responding to attacks on FTP, HTTP, DNS, HTTPS and SSH. Advanced attack detection using network and host based intrusion detection systems. Prerequisite(s): CIS 274 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe Ethernet operation. [REASON]
  2. Compare and contrast the tools and utilities available for frame capture/creation. [REASON]
  3. Perform frame level analysis. [REASON]
  4. Detect ARP spoofing and IP address spoofing. [REASON]
  5. Recognize and analyze ARP and ICMP traffic. [REASON]
  6. Describe TCP/IP vulnerabilities and how to minimize attacks. [REASON]
  7. Describe TCP/IP stack fingerprinting. [REASON]
  8. Examine system logs and statistics for signs of attack. [REASON]
  9. Setup and use a variety of tools to detect and decode attacks. [REASON]

CIS 278: Security Implementation II

Credits: 5.0

Topics include: planning, configuring and implementing firewalls, proxy servers and Web filtering. The use of log consolidation tools will also be covered. Prerequisite(s): CIS 277 or concurrent enrollment, with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and configure security commands in internetworking devices such as routers, switches and firewalls. [REASON]
  2. Design firewall configuration strategies given a business scenario. [REASON]
  3. Authenticate users. [REASON]
  4. Implement appropriate packet filtering. [REASON]
  5. Plan, develop, design and document a firewall strategy. [REASON]
  6. Compare and contrast Bastion Hosts. [REASON]
  7. Implement a secure VPN. [REASON]
  8. Isolate, contain, document and recover from a security breach. [REASON]
  9. Implement appropriate firewall troubleshooting procedure used to fix a given problem. [REASON]

CIS 279: Managing Network Security

Credits: 5.0

Projects include: Conducting vulnerability assessments, penetration tests, and organizational security audits driven by policy. Course maps to the CEH certification. Prerequisite(s): CIS 173 and CIS 277, with minimum grades of 2.5 or equivalent experience.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the types of resources that need to be protected in a networked environment. [COMMUNICATE].
  2. Create a security policy. [REASON]
  3. Write procedures for forming a security organization/department. [REASON]
  4. Describe the functions of a security team. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Describe the procedures for selecting appropriate security components. [REASON]
  6. Describe the major types of DOS attacks and how to protect against them. [REASON]
  7. Describe how to conduct security audits. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Discuss the process of auditing logs and how the audit process should be implemented. [REASON]
  9. Describe how to conduct a postmortem analysis of an attack. [REASON]

CIS 280: Career Planning

Credits: 1.0

Description of the various jobs available to CIS graduates and the development of job hunting skills are covered in this course. Resume, cover letter writing, and interviewing techniques are also covered. Internship applications are made in this course. Prerequisite(s): Students must have attained 45 credits toward a CIS ATA degree.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. List job titles available as a graduate of the CIS program. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Develop job search and interviewing skills. [REASON]
  3. Register on the CAC's (www.collegecentral.com) website. [REASON]
  4. Create a resume and various cover letters. [COMMUNICATE ]
  5. Participate in activities such as: on-line job search, reading trade journals/want ads, the interview process. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Be aware of the internship application process. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. List and describe resources on campus and on-line for job search/placement. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Create a list of at least 10 companies you would apply to and research and document the main features of each that would be important for your cover letter and/or interview. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 291: Technology Internship

Credits: 1.0 to 10.0

Students working towards degrees/certificates in CIS & CEN programs, in the 2nd year of their course work, receive on-the job training in information or electronics technology. One credit for each 30 hours worked. Registration by entry code only; obtain code from instructor. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Document and acquire IT skill set, goals and work schedule set-forth by the student and coordinator in the Internship Agreement and Learning Objectives pages of the Internship Paperwork. [REASON]

CIS 293: Digital Forensics III

Credits: 5.0

Forensic triage and other advanced topics. Conducting forensic analysis from start to finish, dealing with live systems and malware. Topics may vary based on current developments and trends. Prerequisite(s): CIS 273 with a GPA of a least 2.5, or instructor approval.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate methods to use VMware/Virtual PC as a forensic analysis tool. [REASON]
  2. Utilize common forensic tools to process a case from start to finish. [REASON]
  3. Create a comprehensive forensic analysis report. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Develop and use regular expressions to increase search effectiveness. [REASON]
  5. Create and verify hash sets of various formats, including Hashkeeper, NSRL, and FTK. [REASON]
  6. Describe a code of ethics and conduct related to the information security and digital forensics professions. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Identify standards of professionalism and ethical behavior for information security and digital forensics professionals, and apply these standards successfully to ethical dilemmas. [ACT]
  8. Create a list of issues related to computer privacy and document how to address them technically and ethically. [REASON]

CIS 294: Advanced Data Recovery and Clean Room Operations

Credits: 5.0

Covers the technical and administrative aspects of using clean room equipment to facilitate data recovery from various media, as well as advanced digital forensics and data recovery techniques. Prerequisite(s): CIS 293 with a grade of at least 2.5 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recover data from a variety of computer media. [REASON]
  2. Appropriately use data recovery tools and equipment such as: write blockers, micro-tweezers, dental picks, anti-static gloves and finger cots. [REASON]
  3. Setup and utilize a data recovery workstation with associated drive connectors and BIOS bypass tools. [REASON]
  4. Describe the processes used for logical and physical recovery of disabled hard drives. [REASON]
  5. Swap single and multiple hard drive platters. [REASON]
  6. Replace a hard drive head assembly. [REASON]
  7. Describe the processes used to facilitate RAID 0 and RAID 5 recovery. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. List and describe the environmental and technical requirements for operating clean room equipment to facilitate the recovery of data from various media. [COMMUNICATE]
  9. Work as a team to analyze, design and implement a data recovery project. [REASON]

CIS 295: Malware Analysis

Credits: 5.0

This course prepares forensic analysts, information security professionals and incident responders to reverse-engineer malicious software using practical tools and techniques. Prerequisite(s): CIS 293 with a grade of at least 3.0 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

 Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use tools and their respective functions for the various stages of the malware analysis process. [REASON]
  2. Deconstruct common root kit components and functions to include resident malicious code, VB Macros, Java-Script executables and Shellcode executables. [REASON]
  3. Apply procedures used to intercept and analyze network traffic generated by malware. [REASON]
  4. Using virtual computing technologies, implement tools and processes used to create a lab environment for reverse-engineering malware. [REASON]
  5. Modify malicious code to defeat anti-forensic measures contained in self-defending malware. [REASON]
  6. Examine various formats used to "pack" malicious executable code, and use and select the appropriate tools for unpacking the code. [REASON]
  7. De-obfuscate malicious code packages within executables. [REASON]
  8. Perform static memory malware analysis from artifacts resident in Random Access Memory. [REASON]
  9. Describe how malware utilizes Windows Operating System API functions for propagation and concealment. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Describe how processes are translated between memory registers, memory stack, and instructions contained in software code. [COMMUNICATE]

CIS 298: Advanced Individual Project

Credits: 1.0 to 5.0

Advanced independent projects under the direction and supervision of a CIS instructor. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available. Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Present evidence of completion of all aspects of a second year project as specified in a contract created and agreed upon by the student and instructor. [REASON]


CIS 299: Special Projects

Credits: 5.0

Note: Credit for a credit designed project is available with approval. For information please contact the CIS department at (425)640-1902. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Present evidence of completion of all aspects of a second year project as specified in a contract created and agreed upon by the student and instructor. [REASON]