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Anthropology

Course Descriptions

ANTH& 100: Survey of Anthropology:CD

Credits: 5.0

Anthropology draws from natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities to think critically about what it means to be human. We focus on diverse answers that humans have produced to fundamental questions. Who are we? Where did we come from? Where do we go from here?

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define anthropology and each its primary subfields: biological, cultural, linguistic and archaeological. [EXPLORE]
  2. Explain the theory of evolution and its primary principles. [REASON]
  3. Describe human relationships with animals, plants and natural resources as part of an ecosystem. [ACT]
  4. Define traditional ecological knowledge and its role in culture and adaptation. [EXPLORE]
  5. Identify the fossil, genetic and artifactual evidence for human evolution and migration. [REASON]
  6. Outline the history of human evolution and migrations out of Africa. [REASON]
  7. Define culture and explain its importance as an adaptive tool in human societies. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Describe the significance of agriculture, cities, industry and globalization in cultural evolution. [EXPLORE]
  9. Explain the role of language, religion and social systems in human culture. [EXPLORE]
  10. Outline anthropological methods, including scientific method and participant observation. [REASON]
  11. Define ethnocentrism and cultural relativism and describe the ways that each can impede our understanding of other humans. [EXPLORE]
  12. Identify ways that anthropological methods and knowledge can be applied to help solve contemporary problems. [ACT]

ANTH& 104: World Prehistory:CD

Credits: 5.0

Students learn to combine archaeological methods with knowledge of diverse prehistoric cultures to investigate some of the most significant aspects of our deep past, including the "birth" of culture, the origins of agriculture, and the development and decline of civilizations (was ANTHR 105).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define anthropology and culture. [REASON]
  2. Explain how human cultural evolution is studied through archaeological procedures. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Distinguish an archaeological approach to the study of humans from that of physical anthropology, linguistics and other social and biological sciences. [REASON]
  4. Outline and apply major features of the scientific method and associated steps in archaeological research. [REASON]
  5. Identify the methods for archaeological excavation, site survey, artifact replication experiments, laboratory analysis and archaeological interpretation of past events. [ACT]
  6. Communicate with basic archaeological/anthropological terminology and relate important feature of major archaeological concepts and theories. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Identify leading contributors to the field of archaeology/anthropology and their work. [EXPLORE]
  8. Describe how archaeologists use evidence to explain how cultures evolved through time and space in different parts of the world. [REASON]
  9. Describe general processes of cultural evolution, including population pressures, intensified production, environmental depletion and evolving cultural goals, and how these effect past, present and future cultures. [EXPLORE]
  10. Identify career opportunities in archaeology, considering positions (a) in academia, (b) with state and federal agencies (e.g. National Park Service, National Forest Service, Corps of Engineers, and Bureau of Land Management, and (c) as a private contractor. [ACT]
  11. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 130: American Religious Diversity:CD

Credits: 5.0

(Was ANTHR 130) Diversity of American religious experiences from historical and cultural perspectives, including the interaction between globalization, immigration, ethnicity, and culture in American Indian, Western, and Eastern traditions. Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENGL 100. Crosslisted as: DIVST 130.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate and apply social scientific (economic, psychological, sociological, and cultural) theories of religion. [REASON]
  2. Examine and evaluate anthropological theories of ethnicity. [REASON]
  3. Discuss diverse religious beliefs with peers in classroom. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Analyze religious communities using social scientific theories. [REASON]
  5. Present, in writing and/or orally, results of theoretical analyses and ethnographic research. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Reflect on the connection between service and learning in service-learning project. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Examine and evaluate the historical impact of immigration, politics, economics and globalization on American religious experiences. [EXPLORE]
  8. Compare and contrast the beliefs, growth, development, and success of American Indian, Christian, Jewish, Mormon, Muslim, Baha'i, Hindu, and/or Buddhist traditions in the Americas. [EXPLORE]
  9. Conduct an ethnographic research project examining a religious community different from one's own. [EXPLORE]
  10. Conduct a service-learning project in partnership with a local religious community, government agency, tribe or non-profit. [ACT]
  11. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 155: Special Topics

Credits: 5.0

Special topics in Anthropology are studied (was ANTHR 155).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate and apply social scientific theories. [REASON]
  2. Present, in writing and/or orally, results of theoretical analyses and/or ethnographic research. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Connect special topic to cultural diversity. [EXPLORE]
  4. Engage with communities and/or individuals through action and/or research. [ACT]

ANTH 198: Individual Project in Anthropology

Credits: 5.0

Selection, design and completion of project in the field of intermediate to advanced anthropology. Student consults with faculty member in all aspects of the project. S/U grade option (was ANTHR 198). Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available. Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Examine and evaluate an independent topic while employing anthropological theories and/or approaches. [REASON]
  2. Propose an independent topic and project. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Communicate in writing and/or orally the results of independent service-learning and/or research project. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Select cultural topics of interest and propose a means for exploring them. [EXPLORE]
  5. Conduct a service-learning or research project in partnership with a community group or organization. [ACT]

ANTH 201: Human Ecology I:CD

Credits: 5.0

Apply traditional ecological knowledge and modern science to contemporary problems. Partner with tribes, governments, nonprofits and businesses to make our community more sustainable through wildlife tracking, habitat restoration and environmental stewardship.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct participant observation and service-learning activities with tribes, government agencies and/or non-profit organizations. [ACT]
  2. Explain the value of participant observation and service-learning as research tools in anthropology and the social sciences. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Describe and discuss the significance of relationships between human social systems and the ecosystems in which they participate. [REASON]
  4. Identify common native and invasive plants of Western Washington and describe their cultural uses. [ACT]
  5. Identify common species of animals in Western Washington and recognize their tracks and signs. [ACT]
  6. Outline the steps of the scientific method. [REASON].
  7. Participate directly in collaborative field-based activities employing scientific approaches to ecological stewardship. [ACT]
  8. Explain the theory of evolution and its impact on humans and their ecosystems. [REASON]
  9. Identify government agencies, non-profit organizations, business and industry involved in sustainable development. [ACT]
  10. Maintain field notes that record, describe and/or quantify human interventions in local ecosystems. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Reflect orally and in writing on the value of service as a means of making a difference in a community. [COMMUNICATE]
  12. Distinguish between sustainable and unsustainable human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]
  13. Identify the crucial role of culture in the sustainability of human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]

ANTH 202: Human Ecology II

Credits: 5.0

Apply traditional ecological knowledge and modern science to contemporary problems. Partner with tribes, governments, nonprofits and businesses to make our community more sustainable through wildlife tracking, habitat restoration and environmental mentorship (was ANTHR 102). Prerequisite(s): ANTH 201 (was ANTHR 101).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct participant observation and service-learning activities with tribes, government agencies, and/or non-profit organizations. [ACT]
  2. Explain the value of participant observation and service-learning as research tools in anthropology and the social sciences. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Describe and discuss the significance of relationships between human social systems and the ecosystems in which they participate. [REASON]
  4. Identify common native and invasive plants of Western Washington and describe their cultural uses. [ACT]
  5. Identify common species of animals in Western Washington and recognize their tracks and signs. [ACT]
  6. Outline the steps of the scientific method. [REASON].
  7. Participate directly in collaborative field-based activities employing scientific approaches to ecological stewardship. [ACT]
  8. Explain the theory of evolution and its impact on humans and their ecosystems. [REASON]
  9. Identify government agencies, non-profit organizations, business and industry involved in sustainable development. [ACT]
  10. Maintain field notes that record, describe and/or quantify human interventions in local ecosystems. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Reflect orally and in writing on the value of service as a means of making a difference in a community. [COMMUNICATE]
  12. Distinguish between sustainable and unsustainable human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]
  13. Identify the crucial role of culture in the sustainability of human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]
  14. Share an indigenous narrative, news story, poem or other reading material conveying traditional ecological knowledge. [COMMUNICATE]
  15. Lead a reflection activity inviting other students to connect their service with their learning. [COMMUNICATE]
  16. Lead a team of students through a term-long stewardship project culminating in an essay and oral presentation. [COMMUNICATE]
  17. Serve as a peer advocate/mentor to other students new to ecological stewardship. [ACT]

ANTH 203: Human Ecology III

Credits: 5.0

Apply traditional ecological knowledge and modern science to contemporary problems. Partner with tribes, governments, nonprofits and businesses to make our community more sustainable through wildlife tracking, habitat restoration and environmental mentorship (was ANTHR 103). Prerequisite(s): ANTH 202 (was ANTHR 102).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct participant observation and service-learning activities with tribes, government agencies, and/or non-profit organizations. [ACT]
  2. Explain the value of participant observation and service-learning as research tools in anthropology and the social sciences. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Describe and discuss the significance of relationships between human social systems and the ecosystems in which they participate. [REASON]
  4. Identify common native and invasive plants of Western Washington and describe their cultural uses. [ACT]
  5. Identify common species of animals in Western Washington and recognize their tracks and signs. [ACT]
  6. Outline the steps of the scientific method [REASON].
  7. Participate directly in collaborative field-based activities employing scientific approaches to ecological stewardship. [ACT]
  8. Explain the theory of evolution and its impact on humans and their ecosystems. [REASON]
  9. Identify government agencies, non-profit organizations, business and industry involved in sustainable development. [ACT]
  10. Maintain field notes that record, describe and/or quantify human interventions in local ecosystems. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Reflect orally and in writing on the value of service as a means of making a difference in a community. [COMMUNICATE]
  12. Distinguish between sustainable and unsustainable human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]
  13. Identify the crucial role of culture in the sustainability of human-ecosystem interactions. [REASON]
  14. Share an indigenous narrative, news story, poem or other reading material conveying traditional ecological knowledge. [COMMUNICATE]
  15. Lead a reflection activity inviting other students to connect their service with their learning. [COMMUNICATE]
  16. Lead a team of students through a term-long stewardship project culminating in an essay and oral presentation. [COMMUNICATE]
  17. Serve as a peer advocate/mentor to other students new to ecological stewardship. [ACT]
  18. Lead training sessions of other students new to ecological stewardship. [ACT]

ANTH& 206: Cultural Anthropology:CD

Credits: 5.0

An introduction to the nature of culture as a set of rules for the shared, learned, and patterned forms of behavior found in each society. Emphasis on theoretical orientation, cultural adaptation and integration, social organization, and cultural variation (was ANTHR 120).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define anthropology and culture. [REASON]
  2. Distinguish cultural anthropology from archaeology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology and other social and natural sciences. [REASON]
  3. Conduct participant observation and service-learning projects with local community partners. [ACT]
  4. Explain the value of participant observation and service learning as research tools in cultural anthropology and the social sciences. [REASON]
  5. Describe and discuss the significance of relationships between human social systems and the ecosystems in which they participate. [ACT]
  6. State and explain the theory of evolution and its impact on humans and their cultures. [REASON]
  7. Reflect orally and in writing on the value of service as a means of making a difference in a community. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Identify the crucial role of culture in the sustainability of human-ecosystem interactions. [EXPLORE]
  9. Explain how societies are interrelated and the increasing impact of globalization on human lives and cultures. [EXPLORE]
  10. Define ethnocentrism and cultural relativism. [EXPLORE]
  11. Recognize and describe the key features of human cultures and society: adaptation, family, kinship, religion, politics, economics, gender roles, etc. [REASON]
  12. Describe the inherent value of cultural and biological diversity for adaptation and survival. [EXPLORE]
  13. Distinguish sex and gender; describe the ways that our biology and culture are evident in our sexuality and gender. [EXPLORE ]
  14. Identify ways that cultural anthropological research methods, knowledge and skills can be applied to the solution of contemporary world problems. [EXPLORE]

ANTH& 210: Indians of North America:CD

Credits: 5.0

Native North American culture from arrival on the continent through today. Considers traditional cultures and impact of colonization. Examination of current laws, policies, and conflicts including land claims, fishing rights, sovereignty, and religion.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Outline the cultural contributions of indigenous peoples to the history and society of the United States, Canada, Mexico and Central America. [EXPLORE]
  2. Identify and describe major indigenous cultural groups in North America. [EXPLORE]
  3. Define anthropology and culture. [REASON]
  4. Distinguish cultural anthropology from archaeology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology and other social and natural sciences. [REASON]
  5. Conduct participant observation and service-learning with tribal communities. [ACT]
  6. Explain the value of participant observation and service-learning as research tools in cultural anthropology and the social sciences. [REASON]
  7. Describe and discuss the significance of relationships between indigenous social systems and the ecosystems in which they participate. [REASON]
  8. Define traditional ecological knowledge and explain its significance for contemporary societies. [REASON]
  9. Explain the theory of evolution and its impact on humans and their cultures. [REASON]
  10. Reflect orally and in writing on the value of service as a means of making a difference in a community. [COMMUNICATE]
  11. Identify the crucial role of culture in the sustainability of indigenous societies. [EXPLORE]
  12. Outline the historical conditions that led to tribes, First Nations and other forms of social and political organization in native communities. [REASON]
  13. Explain how indigenous societies are impacted by modern states and globalization. [REASON]
  14. Define ethnocentrism and cultural relativism. [EXPLORE]

ANTH& 215: Bioanthropology:CD

Credits: 5.0

Students examine human origins, diversity, and sexuality from the perspective of physical anthropology. Topics include evolution, genetics, primate anatomy, fossil record, biocultural adaptation, and human physical and sexual variation (was ANTHR 110). Prerequisite(s): Placement into both ENGL& 101 (was ENGL 105) and MATH 090.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between scientific and nonscientific approaches to human origins. [REASON]
  2. Explain the basic principles of evolution (natural selection, mutation, gene flow, and genetic drift). [REASON]
  3. Examine and evaluate the application of genetics to human evolution and migration patterns. [ACT]
  4. Compare and contrast human, ape, and monkey skeletal anatomy. [REASON]
  5. Examine and evaluate the ape and hominid fossil record. [REASON]
  6. Compare and contrast biological and cultural impacts on human physical and sexual variation. [EXPLORE]
  7. Conduct participant observation and service-learning with local community organizations. [ACT]
  8. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity. [EXPLORE]

ANTH& 216: Northwest Coast Indians:CD

Credits: 5.0

Origins, development, and variation of indigenous Northwest cultures through archaeological artifacts, ethnographic records, oral histories, and teachings. Research topics include potlatch, whaling and fishing rights, religion, sovereignty, casinos, art, and ecotourism. Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe, compare and contrast orally and in writing diverse Northwest Coast indigenous cultures. [COMMUNICATE]
  2. Identify and evaluate strengths and limitations of archaeological, ethnohistorical, ethnographic, and sociocultural methods and theories. [REASON]
  3. Evaluate current competing accounts of the origins and development of Northwest Coast cultural traditions. [REASON]
  4. Enumerate and describe impacts of European colonization of the Northwest Coast on indigenous people. [EXPLORE]
  5. Describe the intricacies of important political, economic, religious, and social issues Native Americans and First Nations face today, such as land claims, fishing rights, ecotourism, casinos, whaling, repatriation, and sovereignty. [EXPLORE]
  6. Conduct participant observation and service-learning with local tribal communities. [ACT]
  7. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 255: Special Topics

Credits: 5.0

Special topics in Anthropology are studied (was ANTHR 255).

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate anthropological concepts and theories within a specific topical context. [REASON]
  2. Describe orally and/or in writing key anthropological concepts related to a specific topic. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Conduct participant observation and service-learning with local community organizations. [ACT]
  4. Explore the role of culture and diversity within a selected anthropological topic. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 270: Field Methods in Archaeology:CD

Credits: 5.0

Experience archaeological field methods through lectures, excavation, and laboratory analysis of cultural materials. Immersion in local culture and history enables students to contribute to public education efforts and gain traditional cultural knowledge. Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Participate in a group learning experience and contribute to the solution of common archaeological tasks and problems. [ACT]
  2. Describe local culture, traditional subsistence, settlement practices, technology, and art. [REASON]
  3. Participate in local cultural renewal efforts. [EXPLORE]
  4. Communicate with the public about techniques in archaeological fieldwork, and about regional archaeology and local history in the immediate vicinity of the field school. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Distinguish between theoretical approaches in archaeology (e.g., culture history and culture process; typological and population thinking) and describe the effect of each on data collection, analysis, and inference. [REASON]
  6. Explain the three phases of cultural resource management in archaeology: cultural resource inventory, testing, and mitigation. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Compare and contrast excavation by natural and arbitrary stratigraphic units and explain the methodological contexts in which each is useful. [ACT]
  8. Perform laboratory techniques necessary to conserve and curate cultural materials. [ACT]
  9. Prepare and maintain a field notebook meeting generally accepted scientific standards for research in the field, including the documented events, observations, data, line drawings, etc. [COMMUNICATE]

 


ANTH 271: Laboratory Methods in Archaeology:CD

Credits: 2.0

"Hands on" work with archaeological materials in a laboratory setting and proper techniques of artifact preparation, identification, documentation, data collection, and curation. Analytic techniques applied to current research questions.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify common types of artifacts found in archaeological sites. This will include working with classifications and taxonomic keys to identify cultural material and various species of animals and plants derived from archaeological contexts. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate protocols for data collection, labeling and cataloging of archaeological artifacts. [ACT]
  3. Demonstrate competency in gathering and/or manipulating data derived from cultural remains. [ACT]
  4. Analyze cultural data within the context of a current research question. [EXPLORE]
  5. Participate in at least one aspect of the development of a final archaeological field report. [COMMUNICATE]

ANTH 272: Field Methods in Archaeology II

Credits: 2.0

Experience archaeological field methods through lectures, excavation, and laboratory analysis of cultural materials. Contribute to public education efforts and gain traditional cultural knowledge through immersion in local culture and history. Serve as peer advocates for introductory students. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 270 & ANTH 271. Placement into ENGL& 101 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Participate in a group learning experience and contribute to the solution of common archaeological tasks and problems. [ACT]
  2. Describe local culture, traditional subsistence, settlement practices, technology, and art. [REASON]
  3. Participate in local cultural renewal efforts. [EXPLORE]
  4. Communicate with the public about techniques in archaeological fieldwork, and about regional archaeology and local history in the immediate vicinity of the field school. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Distinguish between theoretical approaches in archaeology (e.g., culture history and culture process; typological and population thinking) and describe the effect of each on data collection, analysis, and inference. [REASON]
  6. Explain the three phases of cultural resource management in archaeology: cultural resource inventory, testing, and mitigation. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Compare and contrast excavation by natural and arbitrary stratigraphic units and explain the methodological contexts in which each is useful. [REASON]
  8. Perform laboratory techniques necessary to conserve and curate cultural materials. [ACT]
  9. Prepare and maintain a field notebook meeting generally accepted scientific standard for research in the field, including the documented events, observations, data, line drawing, etc. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Lead a team of students through archaeological fields activities. [ACT]
  11. Serve as a peer advocate/mentor to other students new to archaeological field methods. [COMMUNICATE]

ANTH 273: Laboratory Methods in Archaeology II:CD

Credits: 2.0

Experience hands on work with archaeological materials in a laboratory setting. Learn proper techniques of artifact preparation, identification, documentation, and data collection. Apply analytic techniques to current research questions. Serve as peer advocate for introductory students. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 271. Placement into ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

 Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify common types of artifacts found in archaeological sites. This will include working with classifications and taxonomic keys to identify cultural material and various species of animals and plants derived from archaeological contexts. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate protocols for data collection, labeling and cataloging of archaeological artifacts. [ACT]
  3. Demonstrate competency in gathering and/or manipulating data derived from cultural remains. [ACT]
  4. Investigate cultural data within the context of a current research question. [EXPLORE]
  5. Write clear and concise descriptions and analyses of artifacts. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Develop leadership skills as they lead a team of students through archaeological lab activities. [ACT]
  7. Effectively communicate, as a mentor, with other students new to archaeological field methods. [COMMUNICATE]

ANTH 274: Field Methods in Archaeology III

Credits: 2.0

Experience archaeological field methods through lectures, excavation, and laboratory analysis of cultural materials. Contribute to public education efforts and gain traditional cultural knowledge through immersion in local culture and history. Serve as peer advocates for introductory students.  Explore archaeology careers. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 272. Placement into ENGL& 101 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Participate in a group learning experience and contribute to the solution of common archaeological tasks and problems. [ACT]
  2. Describe local culture, traditional subsistence, settlement practices, technology, and art. [REASON]
  3. Participate in local cultural renewal efforts. [EXPLORE]
  4. Communicate with the public about techniques in archaeological fieldwork, and about regional archaeology and local history in the immediate vicinity of the field school. [COMMUNICATE]
  5. Distinguish between theoretical approaches in archaeology (e.g., culture history and culture process; typological and population thinking) and describe the effect of each on data collection, analysis, and inference. [REASON]
  6. Explain the three phases of cultural resource management in archaeology: cultural resource inventory, testing, and mitigation. [COMMUNICATE]
  7. Compare and contrast excavation by natural and arbitrary stratigraphic units and explain the methodological contexts in which each is useful. [REASON]
  8. Perform laboratory techniques necessary to conserve and curate cultural materials. [ACT]
  9. Prepare and maintain a field notebook meeting generally accepted scientific standards for research in the field, including the documented events, observations, data, line drawings, etc. [COMMUNICATE]
  10. Lead a team of students through archaeological field activities. [ACT]
  11. Serve as peer advocate/mentor to other students new to archaeological field methods. [COMMUNICATE]
  12. Prepare for career options in archaeology. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 275: Laboratory Methods in Archaeology II

Credits: 2.0

Experience hands on work with archaeological materials in a laboratory setting. Learn proper techniques of artifact preparation, identification, documentation, and data collection. Apply analytic techniques to current research questions. Serve as peer advocate for introductory students. Explore archaeology careers. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 273. Placement into ENGL& 101 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify common types of artifacts found in archaeological sites. This will include working with classifications and taxonomic keys to identify cultural material and various species of animals and plants derived from archaeological contexts. [REASON]
  2. Demonstrate protocols for data collection, labeling, and cataloging of archaeological artifacts. [ACT]
  3. Demonstrate competency in gathering and/or manipulating data derived from cultural remains. [ACT]
  4. Analyze cultural data within the context of a current research question. [EXPLORE]
  5. Contribute to the development of an archaeology field report. [COMMUNICATE]
  6. Lead a team of students through archaeological field activities. [ACT]
  7. Serve as a peer advocate/mentor to other students new to archaeological field methods. [COMMUNICATE]
  8. Prepare for diverse career options in archaeology. [EXPLORE]

ANTH 298: Individual Project in Anthropology

Credits: 5.0

Selection, design and completion of project in the field of intermediate to advanced anthropology. Student consults with faculty member in all aspects of the project (was ANTHR 298). S/U grade option. Registration is permitted first seven weeks as space is available. Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Examine and evaluate an independent topic while employing anthropological theories and/or approaches. [REASON]
  2. Propose an independent topic and project. [COMMUNICATE]
  3. Communicate in writing and/or orally the results of independent service-learning and/or research project. [COMMUNICATE]
  4. Select cultural topics of interest and propose a means for exploring them. [EXPLORE]
  5. Conduct a service-learning or research project in partnership with a community group or organization. [ACT]