Social and Human Services

Course Descriptions

SHS 100: Orientation in Human Services

Credits: 1.0

Explores career opportunities in human services such as case management; activities and wellness; addiction; and senior, family, child, and youth services. Reviews degree and certificate outcomes, transfer options, practicum requirements and Washington state regulations. Includes orientation to the human services program and to campus resources to support student success. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify campus resources that can be helpful in reaching an informed decision on a career path.
  2. Identify possible career choices in the area of human services, determining goodness of fit based on personal strengths and academic goals.
  3. Describe the academic pathways for selected human services careers, including the difference between professional/technical and transfer degrees.
  4. Identify sequencing of courses based on placement assessments, and strategies for successful completion of degrees and certificates in social and human services, addiction studies, activity director, and/or family support studies.
  5. Utilize advising resources to include requirement sheets, schedule planning, and other advising services.

SHS 103: Introduction to Human Services: CD

Credits: 5.0

Covers the history and importance of human services in society and the values these programs reflect. Includes career paths, knowledge, and skills required for effective practice, and the rewards and challenges of working in this field. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 with a 2.0 or higher or placement in ENGL& 101.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the scope or application of the terms "human services" and "social welfare."
  2. Identify the major categories of human service and social welfare programs in the U.S., how they are funded, and who they are intended to serve.
  3. Explain the intended purposes and functions of human service programs in the U.S.
  4. Describe how political ideology and social policy decisions impact human service program development.
  5. Identify the major historical milestones in the development of human services in the U.S. and the profession.
  6. Identify the foundation and specialized knowledge, skills, and abilities required to adequately perform a variety of human service roles.
  7. Identify trends and challenges impacting human services today.

SHS 104: Introduction to Addiction Studies

Credits: 5.0

Introduction to misuse of and addiction to psychoactive drugs. Includes history, theories, current research and treatment practices, and the nature of successful recovery as well as prevention concepts. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 with a 2.0 or higher or placement in ENGL& 101.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate ability to access and explore research based information regarding the incidence and major demographic prevalence of substance misuse.
  2. Demonstrate ability to accurately apply addiction terminology and conceptual theories and current professional practices.
  3. Describe scientific and theoretical basis of addiction models from medicine, psychology, sociology, and other disciplines.
  4. Explain the general history of licit and illicit drug use in the United States.
  5. Identify drugs from three major classifications and describe the impact on human brain and behavior including psychological, social, and health effects.
  6. Distinguish and describe the potential continuum of drug use, and differentiate drug dependency with the seven diagnostic criteria for this diagnosis.
  7. Provide written description of the nature and general structure of treatment, and the concept of recovery from addiction as a disorder.
  8. Summarize general nature of prevention activity and key assessment components.
  9. Research effects of chronic substance use on consumers, significant others, and communities within political and cultural context as well as the impact of systems on drug taking activity and recovery.

SHS 106: Introduction to Family Support and Prevention

Credits: 5.0

Introduction to family support framework; concepts and professional skills in the field of prevention. Includes theory, evidence based methods and practices, common prevention activities and successful strategies for working with community organizations, families and systems using empowerment model.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify risk, resiliency, and protective factors and processes in individuals, families, and communities impacted by unhealthy living patterns, social/emotional dysfunction, violence, or substance misuse.
  2. Describe various models of prevention and the steps in the prevention planning process.
  3. Identify and demonstrate application of criteria for evaluating success of prevention strategies and programs.
  4. Assess and differentiate ethical community prevention activities.
  5. Demonstrate the application of theories, techniques, and family support framework in prevention planning and community readiness within various situations.
  6. Describe the processes used to establish mutually respectful relationships with families and other community members.
  7. Describe and demonstrate, from a strengths-based perspective, a sensitivity to the cultural issues critical in the design and implementation of prevention activity, and tailor tasks specifically for efforts with diverse populations.

SHS 107: Stress Management Skills

Credits: 2.0

Addresses personal and organizational stress in human services settings and offers techniques for reducing and preventing stress, decreasing burnout, and increasing job satisfaction, including time management techniques. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define stress and describe the psycho-physiological symptoms common to the human reaction.
  2. Explain how events, interpretations, and responses impact the short-term and long-term effects of stress.
  3. Use and evaluate a variety of stress-reduction techniques oriented toward both the mind and the body.
  4. List the factors that block implementation of stress management goals and describe ways to overcome them.
  5. Describe how to set goals for improving stress management and time management, how to choose appropriate techniques, and how to evaluate progress.
  6. Identify symptoms, sources, and ways of managing job related stress.

SHS 111: Social Issues Forum

Credits: 1.0

Seminar with special focus on topics of current interest in the human services field. Presenters include outside human services professionals as well as Edmonds CC faculty. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe issues relating to a current event or topic in the area of human services.
  2. Explain how current information applies to social service workers and consumers.
  3. Identify methods to monitor ongoing information and explore further resources related to topic.

SHS 112: Child and Family Welfare

Credits: 3.0

Investigates the issues facing children and families today, including poverty, homelessness, foster care, and teen parenting. Covers how human service workers and agencies provide protection and intervention, and how we can advocate for change, both individually and as a society.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Analyze both strengths and weaknesses in the current systems serving our children, including what the trends are for the future.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of diverse families in the life of the child, and why services that strengthen families are important for the child.
  3. Identify the factors that contribute to a child being at risk, including poverty, homelessness, and violence.
  4. Describe methods used to support children when their families cannot do so, such as family preservation, foster care placement, residential treatment, and adoption.
  5. Explain the importance of advocacy in gaining positive change for children and families, and describe ways to become involved in local, state, and national advocacy efforts.

SHS 113: Law and Ethics for Addictions and Human Services

Credits: 3.0

Introduction to the foundations and content of ethical codes and the process of ethical decision-making. Includes information about federal and state laws and mandates governing all human services professionals, including addictions professionals. Prerequisite(s): SHS 103 or SHS 104.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate comprehension of the difference between ethics and the law.
  2. Describe multidisciplinary perspectives that influence professional standards and legal mandates.
  3. Articulate the importance of performing self evaluations, client consults, and seeking ongoing supervision.
  4. Integrate information from a comparison of several professional ethical codes, including those for human services and addiction professionals.
  5. Demonstrate awareness and respect for the importance of cultural competency and the ethical codes that address related values.
  6. Describe and summarize the need to adhere to federal and state laws and regulations related to human services or addiction work.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to use Web-based research.

SHS 114: Counseling and Interviewing Skills

Credits: 5.0

Identify values, knowledge, and competencies necessary to engage and sustain helping relationships and to identify and clarify consumer concerns and goals. Stresses effective use of interpersonal communication skills through class participation, reflecive exercises, and role play simulations.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the use of a variety of interpersonal communication skills to establish a therapeutic alliance, support client self disclosure, and move the process of counseling forward.
  2. Identify and demonstrate components of the stages of the helping process and the skills necessary for listening.
  3. Identify how cultural factors may influence the goals and methods a counselor uses to support clients.
  4. Describe how to collect and analyze information about the client, including history, life challenges, and goals, and use this information to support clients in achieving identified goals.
  5. Explain how to assess the severity of a client's issues and/or concerns.
  6. Demonstrate comprehension of motivation and change theory and its significance in shaping the goals and methods used in working with clients or consumers.

SHS 115: Interpersonal and Groupwork

Credits: 4.0

Focuses on interpersonal skills necessary for working with individuals and groups in human service settings. Identifies the role and stages of groups, leadership qualities and conflict resolution. Includes role play and practice of skills for effective group co-facilitation.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and demonstrate interpersonal skills that facilitate communication and create a basis for empathy and mindfulness.
  2. Describe and identify the basic types of groups and the stages of group development.
  3. Explain and develop guidelines for group practice and ethical behaviors when facilitating or participating in a group activity or process.
  4. Describe methods to deal with group dynamics and development.
  5. Demonstrate the skills needed to plan for and lead a group process, including the designing of activities, group exercises, introduction, and closure.
  6. Assess personal competencies to respectfully and effectively communicate with diverse clients and other professionals.

SHS 116: Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies

Credits: 3.0

Introduces evidence-based treatment methods, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and dialectical behavior therapy. Focus is on choosing practical techniques appropriate for clients in various human services and addiction programs.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of current cognitive and behavioral therapies and be able to explain their contribution to current treatment methods.
  2. Describe various cognitive and behavioral techniques and explain their use in the human services field.
  3. Formulate relevant questions about the ethics of using cognitive and behavioral techniques, and use critical thinking to consider controversies in the field.
  4. Explain how the principles of cognitive and behavioral therapies are useful in a variety of settings, and be able to apply the concepts of behavioral analysis and cognitive therapy to various practical situations.

SHS 117: Crisis Intervention

Credits: 3.0

Introduces theory and practice of crisis intervention. Includes history, stages and goals of crisis intervention, types of crises, suicide assessment and intervention, compassion fatigue; methods of resolving crisis. Meets state suicide training requirements. Prerequisite(s): SHS 114.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify stressors, challenges, and other factors that are likely to precipitate a crisis state.
  2. Explain the stages, process, and goals of crisis intervention.
  3. Demonstrate active listening skills that would be needed in a crisis situation.
  4. Describe and demonstrate the skills needed to collect and analyze relevant information about a person in crisis.
  5. Identify key risk factors associated with suicide and the warning signs of suicidal intent.
  6. Describe the effects of crisis intervention on the human service worker.

SHS 121: Case Management and Community Resources

Credits: 3.0

Defines the role and functions of a case manager, history, tasks and challenges of the job, and knowledge and skills necessary to be effective, including how to make referrals and act as an advocate and community resource specialist.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the concept of case management.
  2. Define tasks or functions of a case manager and the key components of the strengths-based case management approach.
  3. Identify what kinds of knowledge and skills are necessary to effectively perform the case manager role.
  4. Identify the essential elements of a comprehensive individualized service or personal responsibility plan (also referred to as a case plan).
  5. Identify a basic process for resolving ethical dilemmas involving service delivery.
  6. Describe the process of making effective referrals.

SHS 145: Introduction to Disabling Conditions

Credits: 3.0

Reviews major disabling conditions. Explores how disabilities affect psychosocial development. Discusses functional limitations and appropriate community resources. Basic medical terminology is reviewed.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Explain the characteristics, causes, and prevalence of disabilities, and describe employment prospects for individuals with disabilities.
  2. Research community resources for high and low tech accommodations used at work and at home.
  3. Describe the psychosocial developments that disabled individuals and their families undergo.
  4. Demonstrate use of respectful language while portraying people with disabilities.
  5. Research and describe support systems and services available for people who have disabilities.

SHS 151: Therapeutic Activities

Credits: 3.0

Explores the role of therapeutic activities in various community settings and the theory underlying this method. Includes development of individual and group activities using creative approaches to improve client functioning and support quality of life. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the role of an activities assistant and the theory underlying activity therapy.
  2. Identify and describe educational and experiential requirements for activity therapy professionals.
  3. Design or enhance an activity program specific to relevant populations, such as seniors or youth; those with disabilities, addiction, or mental illness; or consumers in recreational settings.
  4. Demonstrate ability to plan and facilitate individual and group activity sessions.
  5. Demonstrate skills needed for activity related documentation.

SHS 152: Creative Therapies

Credits: 2.0

Provides an overview of the practice of several widely accepted nonverbal creative activities, therapeutic benefits and applications in Human Services and healthcare settings. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the history and current use of a variety of creative therapy modalities.
  2. Identify and describe educational and experiential requirements for creative arts therapy professionals.
  3. Select and describe techniques for integrating creativity into therapy practice.

SHS 155: Special Topics in Social: Human Services

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

Specialized courses/seminars on current issues in SHS field. Each class will have its own outline and syllabus as appropriate. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe current information and issues relating to the specific seminar topic.
  2. Identify resources related to topic for further exploration or use with consumers.
  3. Explain implication and application of specific seminar information for social service workers and consumers.

SHS 160: Exploration in Human Services

Credits: 1.0 to 8.0

Provides an opportunity to earn credits for experiences such as community service, attendance at workshops or seminars, or other professional development activities including research.1 to 5 credits depending on the scope of the workload. Permit code required. S/U grade option. Registration permitted first seven weeks (six weeks in summer) as space is available.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Develop a focused plan regarding the application of off-campus educational or volunteer experiences to individual career goals.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of a topic area or community agency that is relevant to the general field of human services by attending workshops or seminars, volunteering, or completing other specific professional development activities including research.
  3. Evaluate course experiences and apply them to human service work in the form of a written report.

SHS 161: Aging in America

Credits: 3.0

Introduces the topic of gerontology. Includes information about aging, related social, economic and health consequences and the associated social services roles for those working with older adults. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe "ageism" and its impact on social integration of older adults.
  2. Explain the historical context for the status of older adults in contemporary American culture, including how and why the status of the elderly has changed since Colonial times.
  3. Describe "aging," a developmental stage of adulthood that is positive.
  4. Differentiate normal age-related changes from illnesses that can occur in the later part of life.
  5. Identify adaptive options to the many transitions American adults may experience as they age.
  6. Define "successful aging" and strategies for health maintenance.
  7. Identify cultural factors that influence/limit individual ability to achieve one's greatest potential as an adult.
  8. Identify professional objectives associated with service provision to this cohort.

SHS 162: Aging and Health

Credits: 3.0

Examines the aging process and the normal changes of getting older. Addresses common health problems and mental health concerns in the later years. Emphasis on helping older people maintain good health and well-being and to function at their optimal level. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify theories of aging and social myths that portray aging as an illness.
  2. Identify and describe the major age-related changes in biological functioning, i.e., normal aging.
  3. Identify how gender, socioeconomic status and culture affect the potential health of older adults.
  4. Describe the most prevalent diseases of older adults (acute and chronic) and explain their influence on functioning.
  5. Identify techniques for assisting older people with sensory losses and physical impairments adapt and function at their optimal level.
  6. Describe issues associated with institutional living for the older adult.
  7. Identify preventative and health promotion principles and strategies, and recognize the signs indicating the need for medical attention during older adulthood.
  8. Explain the financial impact of aging and chronic disease on society.
  9. Identify community resources that support healthy aging.

SHS 165: Working with Bereavement

Credits: 3.0

Understanding the role and challenges of human service providers in responding to clients in bereavement. Includes exploration of societal responses to death and dying, coping methods, and styles of mourning. Examination of client, caregiver and system responses to grief and loss. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 10 credits of SHS, FSS and/or AHE courses.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe the difference between grief, bereavement and loss.
  2. Describe some of the cultural belief systems related to death, dying and bereavement.
  3. Explain the biological, psychological and social implications of dying on all affected by the death.
  4. Identify the supports that human service providers can offer to the dying and their families in preparation for death.
  5. Explain the ethical and legal considerations associated with critical care, the dying and the dead.
  6. Describe options for care for the dying such as hospice, POLST, advance directives, end of life consultation and other end-of-life care options.
  7. Articulate the tasks of grief and how death informs all other types of losses.

SHS 166: Senior Services Navigation

Credits: 2.0

Explore the role of the care coordinator/navigator with aging populations. Overview of senior services systems, including eligibility criteria, access issues, individual/family centered coordination, communication and health literacy with older adults, impact of chronic diseases, care transitions within interdisciplinary teams, and community resources.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the role of senior services navigation with individuals and their families.
  2. Describe current systems of senior services, including primary care and behavioral health, housing, activities and wellness, retirement/assisted living/nursing options, and end of life.
  3. Identify preventative health and wellness strategies for older adults in culturally specific communities.
  4. Engage interdisciplinary team members in care coordination.
  5. Recognize signs indicating need for medical attention during older adulthood.
  6. Identify end of life needs and issues for aging individuals and their families.

SHS 170: HIV/AIDS for Health, HS and ACD Professionals

Credits: 1.0

Introduction to causes, symptoms, assessment, treatment and prevention of HIV, AIDS, TB and hepatitis. Includes information about testing, psychosocial issues, counseling, and the Brief Risk Intervention (BRI). Meets requirement for students in healthcare, human services, and addiction professions. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify general clinical course of HIV infection and progression to AIDS.
  2. Identify epidemiological trends, determinants of transmission, and factors influencing the risk of infection of HIV and other infectious diseases (such as STD, HEP B, HEP C, and tuberculosis).
  3. Identify methods of testing used to diagnose HIV and track the course of HIV/AIDS.
  4. Identify counseling needs and drug therapies used in HIV treatment, side-effects, and special considerations.
  5. Identify methods to reduce personal and workplace risks of acquiring HIV/AIDS, including brief interventions.
  6. Develop skills to manage personal fear and resistance in caring for HIV/AIDS-affected individuals.
  7. Identify psychosocial effects of HIV/AIDS for clients, patients, and families.
  8. Develop strategies for making legal and ethical decisions that affect clients with HIV/AIDS.
  9. Identify culturally competent approaches to promoting client knowledge in prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

SHS 185: Human Growth and Development: CD

Credits: 5.0

Addresses the multidimensional process of human development from conception to death. Topics include growth and change across the lifespan from biological, psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 with a 2.0 or higher or placement in ENGL& 101.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe development, including biological, cognitive, and psychosocial, as an ongoing set of processes across the lifespan.
  2. Analyze different developmental events from the perspectives of several theories and recognize those theories when used by others to explain events.
  3. Identify the research methods used in the study of human growth and development and be able to evaluate their usefulness.
  4. Describe development from the perspective of diverse consumer populations and explain developmental controversies related to these differences.
  5. Recognize important developmental concepts and be able to apply them to a variety of career settings.

SHS 186: Youth and Emerging Adult Development: CD

Credits: 5.0

Addresses growth and development of youth (12 to 18 year olds) and emerging adults (18 to 24 year olds) in terms of social-emotional, physical, cultural, and cognitive perspectives. Includes theoretical content, observation, and practical application. S/U grade option. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 with a 2.0 or higher or placement in ENGL& 101.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe youth development, including biological, cognitive, and social-emotional, as an ongoing set of processes, from early adolescence to emerging adulthood.
  2. Analyze the developmental changes experienced by youth from a cultural and historical perspective.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of gender, culture, ethnicity, age, family, peers, and the development of identity on the growing adolescent.
  4. Explain problems youth and emerging adults may face, and show an understanding of the influence of media and technology on development.

SHS 200: Introduction to Prevention

Credits: 3.0

Introduction to concepts and professional skills in the field of prevention. Includes theory, evidence based methods and practices, common prevention activities and successful strategies for working with community organizations.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify risk, resiliency and protective factors and processes in individuals, families, and communities impacted by unhealthy living patterns, social/emotional dysfunction, violence, or substance misuse.
  2. Describe various models of prevention and the steps in the prevention planning process.
  3. Identify and demonstrate application of criteria for evaluating success of prevention strategies and programs.
  4. Assess and differentiate ethical community prevention activities.
  5. Demonstrate the application of theories and techniques of prevention planning and community readiness in various situations.
  6. Describe and demonstrate a sensitivity to the cultural issues critical in the design and implementation of prevention activity and tailor tasks specifically for efforts with diverse populations.

SHS 206: Advocacy In Human Services

Credits: 2.0

This course focuses on the purposes, strategies and tactics for agency, legislative, legal, community, and personal advocacy. Emphasizes advocacy skills, challenges, practice, and ethical guidelines.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the various types of advocacy, including agency, legislative, legal, community, and personal.
  2. Analyze the ethical principles involved in advocacy.
  3. Describe ways to become involved in advocacy efforts at the local, state, and national levels.
  4. Demonstrate communication skills, strategies, and attitudes necessary in advocating for a variety of groups and issues.

SHS 207: Grant Writing for Nonprofits

Credits: 2.0

Provides students with the fundamentals of successful grant writing for nonprofits; researching and evaluating funding sources, researching the problem and its potential solutions, creating a feasible project plan and budget, writing persuasively and effectively. S/U grade option. Prerequisite(s): BRIDGE 093, ENGL 099, or placement into ENGL& 101 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Explain the process and procedures involved with writing a grant to support a variety of nonprofit programs.
  2. Demonstrate ability to research and evaluate funding sources on a local and national level.
  3. Be able to develop a basic grant proposal, including a concrete project plan, action steps, outcomes, and budget.

SHS 208: Behavioral Health Services Navigation

Credits: 2.0

Explore the role of the care coordinator and services navigator with populations having behavioral health needs. Overview of behavioral health systems, eligibility criteria, and access issues. Focus on individual/family centered service coordination, response to acute behavioral health situations working with interdisciplinary teams, and access to behavioral health resource networks.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Define the role of behavioral health navigation with individuals and their families.
  2. Describe current systems of behavioral health services, including mental health, chemical dependency, domestic violence, suicide and self-harm, abuse and neglect, and trauma.
  3. Identify needs of specific behavioral health populations including children, older adults, and culturally specific communities.
  4. Engage interdisciplinary team members in care coordination.
  5. Describe and demonstrate skills necessary to administer mental health first aid.

SHS 216: Counseling Theories

Credits: 5.0

Examines counseling theories such as person-centered, behavioral, cognitive, psychoanalytic, existential, Gestalt, systems, and brief. Includes opportunity to evaluate theories and techniques based on individual career goals. Prerequisite(s): SHS 114

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts and methods underlying contemporary counseling theories, including person-centered, behavioral, cognitive, psychoanalytic, systems, and brief approaches.
  2. Compare and contrast counseling theories to identify common elements and significant differences in how service is provided to clients.
  3. Formulate questions relevant to selecting appropriate methods for use with a variety of clients in different treatment settings.
  4. Develop, articulate, and provide rationale for one's own theory and practice base relevant to specific populations in the area of human services.

SHS 218: Survey of Mental Illness

Credits: 5.0

Overview of nature, management, and treatment of commonly encountered psychiatric disorders. Major diagnoses will be examined in terms of identifying symptoms, current treatment protocols, and the use of psychiatric medications. Prerequisite(s): SHS 114.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe the history of mental health treatment and cultural issues that influence attitudes toward mental health services for providers and consumers of services.
  2. Identify the features of mental health disorders according to the DSM-5, including symptoms, risk factors, functional impairment, and case management challenges.
  3. List common psychotropic medications used for various mental health disorders and explain the role of human service workers in medication management.
  4. Identify the interactions between mental illness and addictions, and explain treatment protocols for clients diagnosed with co-occurring disorders.
  5. Analyze the programs and effectiveness of the mental health service delivery system in Washington state.
  6. Describe the mission and goals of support organizations for the mentally ill such as NAMI and the services they provide.

SHS 219: Working with Diverse Populations:CD

Credits: 3.0

Identifies potential barriers to effective interactions with diverse populations, including culture, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and health differences. Provides a frame of reference and skills for effective work with clients different from oneself. Prerequisite(s): SHS 114 or SHS 115.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe enhanced cultural awareness of living values, life experiences, beliefs, and cultural norms in several ethnically varied populations.
  2. Define and describe the complex dynamics of culture, ethnicity, cultural heritage, prejudice, and concepts regarding racial diversity and societal struggles.
  3. Identify related aspects of personal cultural and ethnic profile and describe how current beliefs, knowledge and values might impact clients.
  4. Identify important resources likely to be useful in counseling culturally diverse or marginalized members of society.
  5. Articulate an understanding of respectful service delivery in human services and the importance of competence in various cultures in order to provide meaningful and relevant counseling.

SHS 222: Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs

Credits: 5.0

Identifies pharmacological and physiological effects of psychoactive substances related to addiction; how effects are produced; treatment methods for chronic conditions and drug interactions. Includes behavioral addictions and psychotropic medications. Prerequisite(s): SHS 104.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe the impact of psychoactive drugs on human body, including ingestion, absorption, metabolism, effects on brain, liver, vascular, organs, and acute and chronic states of related disease, and repair.
  2. Explain the fundamental pharmacological properties of each drug classification and the mechanics of their entry and impact throughout the body and brain.
  3. Explain common medical, psychological. and cognitive conditions that may precede, coexist, or be created by drug misuse, and which mimic intoxication, toxicity, and withdrawal.
  4. Identify physical, pharmacological, and psychological implications and symptoms of intoxication, withdrawal, and toxicity for psychoactive substances alone and in interactions with one another.
  5. Explain the impact of chronic intoxication on cognitive abilities and find research that substantiates this information.
  6. Explain the nature of physiological detoxification, homeostatic dynamics and indicators of recovery for each drug classification.
  7. Demonstrate ability to access and coordinate research on psycho-physiological impact of drugs from various library research and text readings.

SHS 225: Group Treatment in Addiction

Credits: 4.0

Addresses the role and efficacy of group treatment for addictions, including the stages of group development, group dynamics, principles of therapeutic leadership, models of psychoeducation, and best practice guidelines for group work with addiction clients. Active participation is expected. Prerequisite(s): SHS 104, SHS 114, and SHS 115 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe skills involved in forming a group, selection of members, facilitating goals, providing psychoeducation, and criteria for outcome review.
  2. Describe and model skills necessary to assist group members through entry to group, skill building in conflict, trust building, goal setting, and giving feedback.
  3. Describe and model ethical awareness in all professional counseling activity including confidentiality, documentation, and ethical client treatment.
  4. Identify and describe accepted culturally appropriate group counseling models for therapeutic group activity.
  5. Describe and demonstrate in role play and scenario the ability to assess the developmental stage of a group and changes in leader's role at each stage.
  6. Explain importance of the leader's role in making constructive responses when client behaviors are inconsistent with their stated goals, and assisting the group in communication, goal focus, mutual support, and the recovery process.
  7. Describe a leader's need and ability to adapt clinical interventions and counseling strategies based on individual characteristics of client: special needs, culture, health and mental status.
  8. Demonstrate awareness of methods to assess stage of group development, and direct group process and content accordingly.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication skill instruction and the ability to present psychoeducation in group sessions.
  10. Identify resources, supervision methods, and location of evidence based practices to facilitate constant personal and professional growth in group therapy skills.

SHS 226: Addiction and Youth and Family Systems

Credits: 5.0

Identifies impact and dynamics of addiction on the family system, including role distortions, boundary diffusion, absence and neglect, and interference with healthy development. Includes skills for assessment and treatment for addiction with adolescent clients and their reintegration back into the family unit. Prerequisite(s): SHS 104 and SHS 114.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe the impact of addiction on the family system, including roles, boundaries, relationships, and development during both active use and recovery.
  2. Explain the age-specific needs common to adolescents and how addiction impacts development into adulthood.
  3. Identify current screening instruments used for assessment of addiction in youth and describe client placement according to ASAM criteria as it applies to this population.
  4. Demonstrate skills necessary to successfully engage adolescent clients in the interview and assessment process.
  5. Explain confidentiality regulations of Washington state and exceptions in how they apply to adolescents and families.
  6. Identify methods used to involve the family in the treatment and recovery of their family members with addiction, as well as for themselves.
  7. Demonstrate ability to assess and refer individuals, youth, and family members to appropriate resources to support and sustain recovery.

SHS 227: Assessment and Case Management in Addiction

Credits: 5.0

Overview of screening, assessment, ASAM and DSM 5 addictions diagnosis. Training in SBIRT, clinical documentation, record-keeping, funding requirements, utilization review, and mandates applicable to addiction treatment. Prerequisite(s): SHS 104, SHS 114, SHS 218, and SHS 121.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe and demonstrate understanding of the initial assessment process, including SBIRT, screening, assessment, interviewing skills, diagnosis, and person-centered treatment planning.
  2. Locate and describe related federal and state laws and behavioral health organization regulations regarding confidentiality, client care standards, documentation of treatment events, progress, and outcomes.
  3. Describe the symptoms of addiction according to the DSM 5 and ASAM.
  4. Demonstrate ability to determine placement criteria for accurate level of care.
  5. Demonstrate the skills necessary to assess client's readiness for change and to reassess level of motivation throughout treatment.
  6. Describe, based on assessed client needs, the ability to provide appropriate referrals for treatment and other services.

SHS 229: Addiction Counseling and Relapse Prevention

Credits: 5.0

Covers principles and skills in addiction counseling. Reviews consumer treatment procedures and support resources. Includes relapse prevention and recovery assessment, supervision, and workforce dynamics. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): SHS 104, SHS 227, SHS 114, and SHS 216.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Demonstrate ability to recognize, address, and document behavioral problems in a formal addiction treatment context.
  2. Identify components of addiction treatment and continuing care, including recovery planning and relapse prevention.
  3. Explain issues relevant for the profession of addiction counseling, including licensure, reporting regulations, supervision, and self-care.
  4. Analyze various addiction treatment models, including evidence based practices, 12-Step approaches, and non-12-Step approaches, and describe their own beliefs and values related to the counseling process.
  5. Demonstrate familiarity with criteria for addiction severity and differentiate treatment completion from actual recovery.
  6. Explain the process of relapse and demonstrate ability to create stabilizing treatment plan activities.
  7. Demonstrate ability to individualize care plans based on client motivation, ambivalence, and co-occurring disorder complications.

SHS 230: Pre-Practicum

Credits: 3.0

Prepares students for field entry through resume and goal preparation, scheduling interviews, self assessment, supervision discussions, and site selection. Intended for students who have completed foundational courses in SHS or FSS. Students must complete this course prior to enrolling in SHS 231. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): Specific foundational course work based on area of study; consult with faculty advisor.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Review and demonstrate skills and knowledge learned in earlier classes such as: listening skills, group process, self-care, and ethical decision making.
  2. Evaluate personal readiness for a practicum and set preliminary learning goals.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the skills of creating a resume, researching agencies, site selection, preparing for an interview, and clinical documentation.
  4. Explain the requirements, tasks, challenges, and responsibilities required to insure success in a practicum setting.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to complete interviews and evaluate sites for match with personal goals and setting for practicum.

SHS 231: Beginning Field Practicum

Credits: 3.0

Field experience: students observe and learn from working professionals and apply knowledge and theory from classroom to supervised work in community settings. Addiction Studies students should enroll in separate course; consult with faculty advisor. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): ENGL& 101 and SHS 230, and a minimum of 20 additional credits in human service courses with a minimum grade of 2.5 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply discipline skills and abilities learned in classroom to a community setting.
  2. Identify professional challenges of the assigned role in the human service agency.
  3. Observe and analyze information gained during placement at the community setting.
  4. Examine and evaluate personal thinking as well as the thought process and perspective of others.
  5. Demonstrate ability to write clear and well organized reports appropriate for the community setting.
  6. Demonstrate listening skills that positively enhance relationships in a community setting, and show ability to work as part of a professional team.

SHS 232: Advanced Field Practicum I

Credits: 3.0

Field experience: advanced students observe and learn from working professionals and apply knowledge and theory from classroom to supervised work in community settings. Addiction Studies students should enroll in separate course; consult with faculty advisor. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): SHS 231 with minimum grade of 2.0 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply skills and abilities learned in previous practicum settings and the classroom to a community site.
  2. Identify professional challenges of the assigned role in the human service agency.
  3. Observe and analyze information gained during placement at the community setting.
  4. Examine and evaluate personal thinking as well as the thought process and perspective of others.
  5. Demonstrate ability to write clear and well organized reports appropriate for the community setting.
  6. Demonstrate listening skills that positively enhance relationships in a community setting, and show ability to work as part of a professional team.

SHS 233: Advanced Field Practicum II

Credits: 3.0

Field experience: advanced students continue to observe and learn from working professionals and apply knowledge and theory from classroom to supervised work in community settings. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): SHS 232 with minimum grade of 2.0 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply enhanced skills and abilities by participation in additional practicum hours in a community site.
  2. Identify professional challenges of the assigned role in the human service agency.
  3. Observe and analyze information gained during placement at the community setting.
  4. Examine and evaluate personal thinking as well as the thought process and perspective of others.
  5. Demonstrate ability to write clear and well organized reports appropriate for the community setting.
  6. Demonstrate listening skills that positively enhance relationships in a community setting, and show ability to work as part of a professional team.

SHS 255: Special Topics: Social and Human Services

Credits: Maximum of 3.0 possible

Specialized courses/seminars on current issues in the SHS field. Each class will have its own course outline or syllabus as appropriate. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe current information and issues relating to the specific seminar topic.
  2. Identify resources related to topic for further exploration or use with consumers.
  3. Explain implication and application of specific seminar information for social service workers and consumers.

SHS 260: Managing Difficult Behaviors

Credits: 2.0

Provides a framework for understanding the principal causes of angry, reluctant, fearful, and uncooperative behaviors in clients, and provides specific methods of managing and addressing causes. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify common situations that are stressful and tend to bring forth or trigger undesirable and disruptive behavior from clients.
  2. Identify characteristics of agency environments that interfere with appropriate service provision or outcomes.
  3. Identify the most common clinical conditions that present challenges to staff members working with difficult clients.
  4. Identify and describe common disruptive and potentially dangerous client behaviors encountered by human service workers who provide services to people with mental illness.
  5. Describe the process of respectfully approaching and engaging a client who is upset or agitated and angry.
  6. Identify the components and stages of emotional escalation and how to facilitate de-escalation in an agitated client.
  7. Identify and describe possible interventions to reduce the frequency and severity of problematic client behaviors.
  8. Describe proactive behavioral interventions based on standard presentations associated with select diagnoses, e.g., Alzheimer's, dementia.
  9. Identify the importance of and process for seeking and using consultation and clinical supervision in the work place.
  10. Identify the personal and professional issues workers bring to the service environment that impact client response, both positively and negatively.
  11. Identify how cultural variables affect the expression of distress and can impact the definition/perception of and response to difficult behaviors and consumers.

SHS 271: Addiction Studies Field Practicum

Credits: 3.0

Field experience for Addiction Studies: students observe and learn from working Chemical Dependency Professionals (CDPs) and apply knowledge and theory from classroom to supervised work in a certified agency treating those with addictions. State of Washington Chemical Dependency Trainee (CDP-T) certification required before enrollment. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): ENGL& 101 and SHS 230, and a minimum of 20 additional credits in human service courses with a minimum grade of 2.5 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives


SHS 272: Advanced Addiction Studies Field Practicum

Credits: 3.0

Field experience for Addiction Studies: advanced students observe and learn from working CDPs and apply knowledge and theory from classroom to supervised work in a certified agency treating those with addictions. This course builds on skills gained in SHS 271 Addiction Studies Field Practicum. Permit code required. Prerequisite(s): SHS 271 with a minimum grade of 2.0 or instructor permission.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply skills and abilities learned in previous practicum settings and the classroom to a certified agency treating those with addictions.
  2. Evaluate professional roles and challenges of working as a Chemical Dependency Professional Trainee (CDP-T) and a Chemical Dependency Professional (CDP).
  3. Analyze information gained during placement at the certified agency and apply to future career planning.
  4. Assess and evaluate personal thinking as well as the thought process and perspective of others.
  5. Demonstrate ability to write clear and well organized reports, treatment plans, and assessments appropriate for the treatment setting.
  6. Demonstrate advanced listening skills that positively enhance relationships in a certified agency treating those with addictions, including skills necessary to work as part of a professional team.

SHS 299: Special Projects: Social and Human Services

Credits: 1.0 to 5.0

Credit available with approval. For information, contact department faculty. S/U grade option.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Develop a focused plan regarding the application of off-campus educational or volunteer experiences to individual career goals.
  2. Participate in activities in the community, including volunteering, attending workshops or seminars, or completing other specific professional development activities including research.
  3. Evaluate course experiences and apply them to human service work in the form of a written report.