Bachelor of Applied Science Degree

Course Descriptions

CYFS 310: Introduction to Child, Youth and Family Studies

Credits: 5.0

Examines an overview of the field of child and family studies, reviewing its historic development, current trends, and the advantages of an interdisciplinary approach to serving children, youth, and families. Analyzes the application of theoretical and conceptual foundations to a variety of professional career settings in early childhood education and social and human services. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine the intersection between early childhood education and social and human services programs, and the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to enhance the well-being of children, youth, and families.
  2. Formulate knowledge of important concepts and terminology commonly used in the fields of early childhood education, family support, and social and human services.
  3. Construct the historical and socio-political contexts of significant theories related to child and family studies and their effects on policy and programs.
  4. Analyze current models and trends at the local and national level that support the integration of service delivery for systems involved with children, youth, and families.
  5. Distinquish barriers and challenges that influence the ability of systems to provide integrated services for children, youth and families, and ways to facilitate change across the system as a whole.
  6. Discuss and compile professional opportunities and careers that use an integrated model for delivering educational and social services support for children, youth, and families.

CYFS 320: Resources and System Navigation

Credits: 5.0

Examines community resources in the context of community building, family support and empowerment, cultural competence, and social justice. Analyzes and develops skills in navigating complex systems that impact children, youth, and families. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Construct an understanding of the mission, professional roles, and services of community agencies and programs that serve, support, and advocate on behalf of children, youth, and families.
  2. Analyze factors that influence the effectiveness and availability of community programs in order to remove barriers and successfully provide resources to meet the needs of children and families.
  3. Examine the importance of providing individuals with support in navigating the complex systems they are involved with, including the value of consistent, up-to-date information in expanding personal choice and comfort with service options.
  4. Formulate the role of the early childhood educator or social service professional in participating in or facilitating inter-agency communications and teams for families with complex service needs.
  5. Design skills in providing navigation and referrals that have cultural relevancy and are appropriate and respectful of the population of children, youth, or families served in the educational or social services setting.
  6. Evaluate various methods used to support others in accessing resources and negotiating systems for themselves to increase empowerment and the development of self-advocacy.

CYFS 330: Applied Family Systems Theories

Credits: 5.0

Course constructs understanding of interconnected relationships in which children, youth, and families function and grow. Systems theories and the ecological perspective and how they infuence humand development are examined. Evaluates how the interaction within the family systems reflects the social environment in the diversity of socioeconomics, culture, language, and ethnicity, is a central framework of the class. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine the family systems perspective, systems theories, and how they contribute to the understanding of child and family development.
  2. Explain the purpose and practice the use of a genogram to understand family patterns through creation of a schematic diagram of a family's relationship system.
  3. Construct how the ecological perspective can influence educational and social services for children and families through the interconnectedness of individuals, families, children's programs, community settings, social institutions, structures, and cultural values.
  4. Analyze the professional's role as an educator of young children or a social service worker within the family system, as well as, the potential role in the interaction between the systems to support the development and learning of children, youth, and families.
  5. Synthesize knowledge of systems theories in program development in early childhood education, youth, and family services, that is inclusive of cultural diversity and ethnic identity, and respectful of the unique qualities and circumstances of each individual and family.
  6. Evaluate how the family systems framework applies to best practices in strengths-based programs in early childhood, youth, and family services.

CYFS 340: Professional Practice in Child, Youth, and Family Studies

Credits: 5.0

Course examines how laws and policies affect professional practice in educational and social programs. Societal influences that impact professional individuals, and the young children, youth, and families they serve, are constructed in the context of culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual identity, and disabilities. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Analyze how professionalism in programs for young children, youth, and families is established in equity for individuals and families in the framework of culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual identity, and exceptionality.
  2. Examine knowledge and value of the laws and policies that specifically guide educational and social service programs for the health and well-being of young children, youth, and families.
  3. Analyze the Code of Ethics in the profession of Early Childhood Education, and the Ethical Standards for Human Service Professionals in Social Services and Family Support; construct how ethical codes and standards provide a framework for professionalism for specific roles in a discipline.
  4. Develop communication skills that build trust and respect in relationships with children, youth, and adults, as well as, staff members, in educational and social service programs; create understanding of interactions, boundary setting, and confidentiality required in specific professional roles.
  5. Analyze values, beliefs, and assumptions from students' life experiences that can influence understanding of themselves in a professional role to optimally support the unique qualities and circumstances of young children, youth, and families.
  6. Formulate problem-solving and decision-making scenarios in early childhood education and social services that uses professionalism that is informed by laws, policies, ethics, established standards, and knowledge of working with a diverse population.
  7. Design a description of professional practice that integrates knowledge of self with knowledge of professionalism applicable to the education of young children or social services for youth and families.

CYFS 350: Social Policy Issues and Advocacy

Credits: 5.0

Examines how individuals and groups influence social policy. Analyzes models, skills, and approaches necessary to advocate for and influence policy, and to help others learn to advocate for themselves. Examines current issues and programs influencing the well-being and welfare of children, youth, and families. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Analyze social policy as it relates to educational and social services programs, and give relevant examples.
  2. Examine historical influences on the development of social policy and how the values and goals of individuals and groups impact the process.
  3. Discuss how policies affecting children and families at the local, state, and federal level are developed, measured, evaluated, and modified.
  4. Analyze current social policies affecting children and families from the public and private sector, and their impact on the well-being of children, youth, and families.
  5. Evaluate how advocacy methods can be used to influence social, political, and economic systems to bring about changes in policies and programs affecting children, youth, and families.
  6. Define the components and purpose of an advocacy plan, including desired goals and outcomes for agency, legislative, legal, community, and personal advocacy activities.
  7. Construct various methods for advocating for an issue using verbal, written, and interpersonal modes of contact, and the relative benefits of each method in achieving a successful outcome.
  8. Develop advocacy skills that are appropriate for educational and social services programs, including clear communication, self-awareness, and strategies for presenting requests to others.
  9. Design strategies necessary to encourage and support others to advocate for themselves or family members.

CYFS 390: Practicum I

Credits: 5.0

Course constructs learning of principles, practices, and strategies in child, youth, and family studies to professional experiences in early learning or social services programs in the community. Analysis through observation and reflection is a basis for intentional support of constructive developmental growth. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program. Permit code required.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Construct reasoning and professional principles that inform and guide educators or social service workers in their respective roles in supporting children, youth, and families in their community settings.
  2. Apply understanding of competencies of development of children, youth, and families to the specific context of the identified program and practicum site.
  3. Apply knowledge and skills from coursework to roles and responsibilities in community settings in early learning or social services.
  4. Analyze strategies that facilitate intentions of program design for the individual and group through practice and evaluation.
  5. Create a personal and professionally-defined philosophy that guides implementation of programs for the benefit of children and families that are served.
  6. Synthesize understanding of the value of integration of the disciplines of early childhood and social services in gaining further knowledge of children, youth, and families that enhances successful outcomes based on equity and inclusion.

CYFS 410: Social Justice in Child, Youth, and Family Studies

Credits: 5.0

Course examines principles of inclusion and effective interactions with diverse populations, with respect of culture, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities. Theoretical foundations are analyzed to provide professionals in early education and social services with anti-bias strategies that address power, privilege, voice, marginalization, and oppression to transform social structures to strengthen societal equity for children and families. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine the development of social identities in children, youth, and families, and how they are impacted by social justice and equity.
  2. Analyze the complex dynamics of culture, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities, in societal struggles affected by prejudice and bias.
  3. Examine professional goals to increase awareness and understanding of: one's own social identity, human connections and differences, biases related to advantages or disadvantages, and advocacy for social justice.
  4. Construct strategies that recognize and address the effects of overt and covert oppression, power, and privilege that impact the lives of children, youth, and families.
  5. Formulate how early learning and social services programs move beyond stereotypes and biases to actively promote an environment of belonging and safety, inclusive of all children, youth, and families.
  6. Determine the role of an early childhood educator or social services provider to educate children in anti-bias learning, and educate youth, families, colleagues, and community partners about institutional prejudice and discrimination.
  7. Defend a professional philosophy of social justice for programs that support children, youth, and families that promote and reflect societal equity.

CYFS 420: Applied Research Methods and Information Literacy

Credits: 5.0

Analyzes for understanding and critically evaluating research that impacts children, youth, and families. Develops a framework for conducting research and applying knowledge in practical settings. Formulates skills in information literacy and the research process with emphasis on finding, evaluating, and using scholarly information in education and social services settings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program and MATH& 146.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Construct basic designs, methods, and data analysis techniques employed in psychological and behavioral research.
  2. Evaluate existing research studies in the areas of child and youth development, family studies, early childhood education, and social sciences.
  3. Design effective strategies for accessing information and performing library-based research.
  4. Analyze relevant information to apply to work with children, youth, and families using systemic methods.
  5. Evaluate how to incorporate best practices and evidence-based interventions into programming and planning in integrated early education and social services settings.
  6. Determine an understanding of the ethical use of information and research, including copyright, proper citations, and interpretation of results.
  7. Construct effective technological skills to appy to educational and social service professions, established in evidence-based research.

CYFS 430: Trauma and Resilience in Children, Youth, and Families

Credits: 5.0

Examines causes and consequences of stressors affecting children, youth and families. Constructs skills to provide support, early intervention, and prevention of future problems related to trauma, as well as self-care and awareness of the effect of exposure to others' trauma for the professional. Evaluates the significance of the individual's strengths and resilience as important frameworks for assessment and practice. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Formulate an understanding of the pervasiveness of trauma in the lives of people, and the resulting experiences of grief and loss.
  2. Determine situations and events that are stressful for children, youth, and families including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, substance abuse, mental health and physical illness, terrorism, violence, and media influences.
  3. Synthesize the social, emotional, and behavioral effects of exposure to violence and trauma across the developmental spectrum from infancy through adulthood, including the physiological impact on the brain.
  4. Examine how risk and protective factors can influence the impact of adverse childhood events on the individual, and how to use these factors to avoid or minimize the negative outcomes of trauma.
  5. Analyze how to cultivate safe physical and psychological environments to support dignity, respect, and empowerment for children, youth, and families who have been impacted by trauma.
  6. Theorize how to apply the framework of trauma-informed care and services across the spectrum of educational and social services settings.
  7. Compile resources and referrals helpful for a variety of crisis situations and circumstances.
  8. Construct strategies and skills for supporting children, youth and families who have experienced crisis and trauma using each individual's strengths to increase positive outcomes.
  9. Evaluate the impact of secondary trauma as it relates to the early childhood educator or social services professional, and develop specific skills for self-care.

CYFS 440: Leadership in Child, Youth, and Family Programs

Credits: 5.0

The course constructs leadership skills that apply to programs for young children, youth, and families. Supervision, mentoring, and coaching are examined in relationship-based learning practices. Strategies are evaluated through inquiry and reflection, using a strengths-based approach of professional development. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine the roles of supervisor, mentor, and coach, connected to leadership in programs for children, youth, and families; explain the benefits of the roles in fulfilling the mission of educational and social services settings.
  2. Create strategies that support the professional development of staff members; acknowledge strengths; join with individuals in observation, inquiry, and application of ideas; and formulate the mutuality of learning between a supervisor and colleague.
  3. Develop knowledge of interpersonal skills that encourage constructive growth and learning for staff members as both an individual and as a member of a team.
  4. Construct conflict management skills applicable to communication with colleagues, parents, and partners in the community.
  5. Design a leadership philosophy and its application of professional practices and standards to an educational setting for young children or social services programs for youth, or families.
  6. Determine how a leadership philosophy is applied in a program with knowledge of the influences of family, society, culture, gender, and socioeconomic status and dedication to inclusion.
  7. Evaluate a personal and professional leadership plan that utilizes reflective supervision in carrying out leadership for change, in various positions of leadership: teacher, program supervisor or director, facilitator, case manager, or coordinator of services.

CYFS 490: Practicum II

Credits: 5.0

Course synthesizes completed coursework, previous practicums, and past experiences in child, youth, and family studies. A well-developed professional philosophy in early learning or social services is comprehensively evaluated and applied in community settings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program. Permit code required.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Adapt competencies in applying principles of child, youth, and family development to inform curriculum or service planning, for implementation of an early learning or social service program.
  2. Appraise professional knowledge and skills in a leadership role in an early learning classroom or social services program in interactions and building of relationships with children, youth, parents, and other professionals.
  3. Elaborate on inclusive strategies that create trust and respect for the diversity of children, youth, and families in a setting of early childhood or social services.
  4. Synthesize learning of courses, previous experiences with children, youth, and families, and professional standards that inform optimum practices in early learning or social services.
  5. Evaluate the reasoning of a personal and professional philosophy that guides all areas of a program in early learning or social services, providing the foundation for future growth, strengthened with knowledge and perspective of the integration of disciplines.

CYFS 495: Program Development and Capstone Project

Credits: 5.0

Course evaluates components of program development in early childhood education and social services. Best practices of the discipline are assessed and applied to creating new programs, sustaining existing models, adapting to changes, incorporating innovation, and integration of services for the benefit and development of children, youth, and adults that are served. Prerequisite(s): Admission to BAS Program. Permit code required.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Construct the vision and mission of an identified program in relation to outcomes developed or required for: infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, prevention services for youth, and support services for adults and families.
  2. Formulate how to be inclusive and representative of the community in program design and implementation, that are adaptive to individual and group settings, determined by the discipline and emerging needs of the population.
  3. Determine content of program to optimally create the environment and that encourages learning and development appropriate to the specific best practices and responsibilities of programs in early childhood or social services.
  4. Create intentionality in program design through strategies of observation, assessment, and reflection that informs planning that is responsive to program goals and learning frameworks of individual children, youth, and families.
  5. Recommend skills and benefits of collaboration and integration of service in programs for young children, youth, and families that strengthen quality and invite innovation.
  6. Assess knowledge of strategic planning for non-profit and for-profit programs, grant support, in-kind contributions, and other community funding sources and partnerships.
  7. Evaluate how quality early learning and social services programs benefit the community through the positive support of child and youth development and facilitation of individuals and families successfully fulfilling their goals.
  8. Create and defend an individual research-based project in program development with professional application to early education or social services settings.